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•OTFie]S?Hrf-IiEflfflIE.* 

1880. 



1880. 



CONSTITUTION 



AND 



PLAYING RULES 



OF THE 



NATIONAL LEAGUE 



OF 



PROFESSIONAL BASEBALL CLUBS. 



.1 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION, 
Jnclu.lin- the Proceedings ofthel tamon 

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Correct Diagram of a Ball Ground. 







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CONSTITUTION 

OP TIIE 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 



PROFESS! ONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 

18SO. 



ARTICLE I. 



NAME. 






This Association shall be called "The National 
League of Pkofessional Ease Ball Clubs." 

ARTICLE II. 

OBJECTS. 

The objects of this League are: 

1st. To encourage, foster and elevate the game of 
base ball; to enact and enforce proper rules for the 
exhibition and conduct of the game, and to make base 
ball playing respectable and honorable. 

2d. To protect and promote the mutual interests 
of professional base ball clubs and professional buse 
ball players; and 

3d. To establish and regulate the base ball cham- 
pionship of the United States 



34 CONSTITUTION OP THE NATIONAL LEAGUK 

ARTICLE III. 

MEMBERSHIP. 

This League shall consist of the following named 
professional base ball clubs, namely: 

Boston B. B. Association, of Boston, Mass. 

Buffalo B. B, Association, of Buffalo, N. Y. 

Chicago Ball Club, of Chicago, J II. 

Cincinnati B. B. Association, of Cincinnati, O. 

Cleveland B. B. Club, of Cleveland, O. 

Providence B. B. Association, of Providence, R. I. 

Troy B. B. Association, of Troy, N. Y. 

Worcester B. B. Club, of Worcester, Mass. 
And such- other professional base ball clubs as may 
from time to time be elected to membership under the 
following rules, namely : 

1. No club shall be admitted from either of the 
cities above named other than the clubs mentioned, 
except in the event that either of such clubs shall lose 
its membership, and in no event shall there be more 
than one club from any city. 

2. No club shall be admitted from any city whose 
population is less than seventy-five thousand (75,000), 
except by unanimous vote of the League. 

3. No club shall be admitted unless it shall first 
have delivered to the Secretary of the League, at least 
live days before the annual meeting, a written appli- 
cation for membership, signed by its President and 
Secretary, accompanied by documents showing that 
such club bears the name of the city in which it is 
located, and that it is regularly organized and oflicered, 
and, where the State law permits it, chartered. Such 
application shall at once be transmitted by the Secre- 
tary to the President of the League, who shall forth- 
with refer it to a committee of three members of the 
Board of Directors,** appointed by him, who shall im- 
mediately investigate and report upon said application; 



OP PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 



35 



said report to be communicated to the League through 
the Secretary. 

4. The voting upon an application for membership 
shall be by white and black balls. Two black balls 
shall be sufficient to exclude the applicant, and no 
club shall be required, under any circumstances, to 
state how it voted upon such application. Such elec- 
tion shall take place at the annual meeting of the 
League: Provided, That should any eligible club de- 
sire to join the League after the adjournment of the 
annual meeting and before March 1st following, it may 
make application in writing to the Secretary of the 
League, who shall at once communicate such applica- 
tion, together with any facts in his possession concern- 
ing such applicant, to the President of the League, 
who shall refer it to a special committee of the Board, 
as provided in section three of this article; and upon 
receipt by the Secretary of the report of said com- 
mittee, he shall transmit such application and report 
to all League clubs, each of whom shall within ten 
days, transmit one written ballot, for or against the ad- 
mission of such applicant, to the Secretary, and if two 
adverse ballots be not cast, then the Secretary shall, 
upon receipt of the annual dues, notify such club of 
its election. 

ARTICLE IV. 

OFFICERS. 

Section 1. At its annual meeting, the League 
shall elect a President by ballot. The President shall 
be ex officio chairman of the Board of Directors. He 
shall preside at all meetings of the League, and shall 
call special meetings of the League when he may deem 
it necessary, or when thereto requested by half of the 
clubs of the League. 

Sec. 2. The affairs of this League shall be con- 
ducted and controlled by &ve Directors, who shall 
constitute " The Board/* and who shall consist of the 



36 



CONSTITUTION OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



President and four members, to be chosen at the an- 
nual meeting in the following manner: The name of 
each club, except that of which the President is a mem- 
ber, shall be plainly written upon a card, in full view 
of the delegates present, by the Secretary; the cards 
to be of the same size, shape, color and material. The 
cards shall then be placed in some suitable receptacle 
and well shaken together; thereupon four of these 
cards shall be drawn successively, and at random, and 
one delegate from each of the four clubs whose names 
are so drawn, shall, with the President, compose the 
Board, and if any club whose name is thus drawn be 
represented by two delegates, such delegation shall 
name one of its number to be a member of the Board. 

SECKETA11Y AND TREASURER. 

Sec. 3. The Board shall also elect a gentleman of 
intelligence, honesty and good repute, who is versed 
in base ball matters, but who is not, in any manner, 
connected with the press, and who is not a member of 
any professional base ball club, either in or out of the 
League, to be the Secretary of the Board and of the 
Leag 

u:i:Ast ]:i:l'\s di.tiks. 

The Secretary shall be the Treasurer of the League, 
and as such shall be the custodian of all the funds of 
the League, receive all dues, fees and assessments, 
make such payments as may be ordered by the Board, 
or by vote of the League, and render annually a re- 
port of his accounts. 

skcuetaiiy's duties. 
H- shall have the custody and care of the official 
>rds and papers of the League; shall keep a true 
sord of all meetings of the League and the Board; 
11 issue all official notices and attend to the neces- 
sary correspondence; he shall prepare and furnish such 
reports as may be called for by the Board, and shall 
ntitled to such books, stationery, blanks and ma- 
terials as the actual duties of his office may require. 



OF PROFESSIONAL BASE II ALL CLUBS. 



37 



SALARY AND GUAKATNEE. 

He shall receive such salary as the League, by vote, 
shall determine, and shall be reimbursed for all travel- 
ing expenses actualty incurred by him in the service 
of the League; and the Board may exact from him 
such guarantees for the faithful performance of his 
duties as they may" deem for the interest and safety of 
the League. At the expiration of his term of ofhce, 
he shall account for and deliver up to the Board all the 
property and papers which may have come into his 
hands by virtue of his office. 

VACANCY IN THE BOAKO. 

Sec. 4. In ease of a vacancy in the Board by rea- 
son of the death, resignation, absence, or disqualifica- 
tion of any Director, the club of which he was a 
member at the time he was chosen shall designate his 
«essor, and at once notify the Secretary. But if 
such vacancy is caused by the withdrawal, disbanding 
or disqualification of a club represented on the Boara, 
the Board may iill the vacancy by election in the same 
maimer as provided for the electron of Directors in 
Article IV, Section 1, of this Constitution. 

Ill RECTORS 1 QUALIFICATIONS. 

No person shall be qualified to act as a Director who 
is not an actual member of the club he represents; 
nor shall any club, under any circumstances, be repre- 
sented by more than one person on the Board. 
board's duj ■; 
Sec. 5. The Board shall have the general super- 
!i and management of all the affairs and business 
of the League, and shall be individually answerable to 
the League for the faithful discharge of their trust. 
.wniwi, MEETING OF BOARD, AND REPORT. 
The Board shall meet annually on the evening of the 
first Tuesday in December, at the place where the an- 
nual meeting of the League is to be held, but may 
hold special meetings whenever urgent necessity may 



38 



CONSTITUTION OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



require. They shall prepare a detailed report of all 
their doings, and present the same, in writing*, to the 
League, at its annual meeting, which report shall, if 
accepted, be filed with the Secretary, together with all 
official papers, documents and property which may have 
come into their possession by virtue of their office. 

PENALTY. 

Any Director who shall disclose or publish any of 
the proceedings of the Board, except officially through 
the report of the Board, or when called upon by vote 
of the League, shall forfeit his office. 

ARTICLE V. 

cluus. 

Section 1. Each club belonging to this League 
shall have the right to regulate its own affairs, to make 
its own contracts, to establish its own rules, and to 
discipline, punish, suspend, or expel its own players; 
and these powers shall not be limited to cases of dis- 
honest play or open insubordination, but shall include 
all questions of carelessness, indifference, or other con- 
duct of the player that may be regarded by the club 
as prejudicial to its interests : Provided, That noth- 
ing shall be done in violation of, or contrary to, this 
Constitution or the Playing Hides. 

employment of expelled players forbidden. 

Sec. 2. No club shall employ as manager, scorer, 
or player, any person who has willfully violated any 
provision of this Constitution or of the Playing Rules, 
or who has been expelled from any club belonging to 
this League, or who shall be disqualified from playing 
with a club under any provision of this Constitution; 
and any club which shall employ or play, or^ attempt 
to play, in its nine, a player disqualified by any provis- 
ion of this Constitution, shall at once forfeit its mem- 
bership in the League, and all other clubs must and 
shall, under the penalty of the forfeiture of their 



OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 39 

membership in the League, abstain from playing any 
such club until it shall have been reinstated or re- 
elected to membership. 

Sec. 3. Any club having agreed to play a cham- 
pionship game with another club upon a day certain, 
and refusing or failing to meet its engagement, shall 
(unless the failure be caused by an unavoidable acci- 
dent in traveling, or the game be prevented by rain, 
or postponed with the consent, in writing, of the other 
clubs), at once forfeit its membership in the League, 
and all other League clubs must and shall, under pen- 
alty of the forfeiture of their membership in the 
League, abstain from playing any such club until it 
shall have been reinstated or re-elected to member- 
ship. 

Sec. 4. In any case subject to the provisions of 
Sections 2 or 3 of this Article, the club not in default 
shall at once notify the Secretary of the League, by 
writing or telegraph, of the default of the other club, 
stating the particulars of such default, and upon the 
receipt of such notice the Secretary shall at once no- 
tify all League clubs, and the club in default, of the 
forfeiture of membership of such club, stating in such 
notice the nature of the default, and referring to the 
Section of this Article under which such forfeiture of 
membership was incurred. 

Sec. 5. Any player, under contract with a League 
club, who shall, without the written consent of such 
club, leave its service, or who shall be proven guilty 
of offering, agreeing, conspiring, or attempting to lose 
any game of ball, or of being interested in any pool 
or wager thereon, shall be at once expelled by such 
club. 

Sec. 6. Any player, under contract with a League 
club, who shall be guilty of drunkenness or insubordi- 
nation, or of any dishonorable or disreputable conduct, 
may be suspended by such club for the remainder of 
the playing season, or for the remainder of that and 
all of the ensuing playing season, at the option of such 



40 



CONSTITUTION OF TUE NATIONAL LEAGUE 



club; and, during the period of said suspension, such 
player shall be disqualified from playing in or against 
any League club. 

Sec. 7. If any club shall take part in any game of 
ball on Sunday, or if it shall fail to immediately expel 
any man under contract with it for taking part in such 
game as player, umpire or scorer, then, and in either of 
these cases, the club shall forfeit its membership in the 
League, and the Board shall, after calling for and con- 
sidering the defense of the club, if any be furnished 
within ten days after being called for by the Chairman 
of the Board, direct the Secretary, and lie shall at once 
notify all League clubs of the forfeiture of member- 
ship of any club convicted of such olTense; and all 
other League clubs must and shall, under penalty of 
the forfeiture of their membership in the League, ab- 
stain from playing any such club (after the receipt of 
such notice,) until it shall have been reinstated or re- 
elected to membership. 

Sec. 8. Every club member of this League shall 
have exclusive control of the city in which it is located, 
and of the territory surrounding such city to the ex- 
tent of four miles in every direction from its corporate 
limits, and no visiting League club shall, under any 
circumstances — not even with the consent of the local 
League club, until all League championship games on 
that ground shall have been finished — be allowed to 
play any club in such territory other than the League 
club therein located. 

MEMBERSHIP, 

Sec. 9. The players and managers employed by 
the clubs belonging to this League shall be considered 
and treated as members hereof to the extent of being 
always amenable to the provisions of this Constitution, 
and entitled to all its privileges in matters of dispute, 
grievance or discipline, as provided in this Constitution. 

Sec. 10. No game of ball shall be played between 
a League club and any other club employing or pre* 



OF PROFESSIONAL BASK BALL CLUBS. 



41 



senting in its nine a player expellee], or under suspen- 
sion, from the League. Nor shall any League club 
play any club that has, at any time during the same 
playing season, played a game of ball with any other 
club employing or presenting in its nine any player 
expelled or suspended from the League: Provided, 
That, in case the club employing such expelled or sus- 
pended League player shall discharge such player 
from its service, League clubs may thereafter play 
against such club, and against other clubs that may 
have played such club while employing such player. 

ARTICLE VI. 

DUES AND ASSESSMENTS. 

Section 1. Every club shall pay to the Secretary 
of the League, on or before the first day of May of 
each year, the sum of One Hundred Dollars as annual 
dues, and any club failing to pay said sum by such 
time shall thereby forfeit its membership in the League, 
and the Secretary of the League shall notify all League 
clubs of such forfeiture of membership, by telegraph, 
on said first day of May, and all other League clubs 
must and shall, under penalty of the forfeiture of their 
membership in the League, abstain from playing any 
such club until it shall have been reinstated or re- 
elected to membership. 

ARTICLE VII. 

FORFEITING i MEMBEKSHIP. 

The membership of any club belonging to this 
League shall be forfeited under the following circum- 
stances, namely: 

1st. By voluntary withdrawal or disbandinent. 

2d. By failing or refusing to comply with any law- 
ful requirement or order of the Board. 

3d. By willfully violating any provision of this 
Constitution, or the Playing Rules adopted hereunder: 
Provided \ That in all cases where this Constitution 



42 



CONSTITUTION OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE 



does not specifically inflict immediate forfeiture of 
membership, such forfeiture shall be subject to a two- 
thirds vote of the League at its annual meeting, and 
no club which has forfeited its membership shall be 
readmitted except by unanimous vote of the League. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

DISPUTES AND COMPLAINTS. 

Section 1. The Board of Directors shall at once 
consider any complaint preferred by a club against a 
player of another club for conduct in violation of any 
provision of this Constitution or prejudicial to the 
good repute of the game of base ball, and shall have 
power to require the club to which such player may 
belong to discipline him, and, upon repetition of such 
offense, to expel him: Provided, That such complaint 
be preferred in writing, giving such particulars as may 
enable the Board to ascertain all the facts, and be 
transmitted to the Secretary, by whom it shall at once 
be referred to the Board. 

disputes between clubs involving construction 
op Tins constitution. 

Sec. 2. The Board shall be the sole tribunal to 
determine disputes between two or more clubs which 
involve the interpretation or construction of this Con- 
stitution, or any of its Articles, and facts in contro- 
versy. When such a dispute arises, and either club 
shall signify to the other its desire for the Board to 
decide the matter, each club shall furnish to the Sec- 
retary, as soon as possible, a written statement of its 
side of the dispute, with the names of its witnesses, 
or an agreed statement of facts, if possible, which the 
Secretary shall docket in the order of its reception, 
and at the next annual meeting the clubs shall present 
themselves before the Board with their testimony, and 
the Board shall proceed to try the case impartially and 
render a true verdict. » The Board shall have a right 
to put the witnesses under oath, and must do so if de- 



OF PROFESSIONAL IJASK BALL CLUBS. 



43 



manded thereto by either party. No Director shall sit 
on the trial of a cause in which his club is interested, 
but must retire and permit the others alone to deter- 
mine the matter. The finding of the Board, in such 
a case, shall be t /&ViaZ, and under no circumstances shall 
be reconsidered, reopened or inquired into, either by 
the League or any subsequent Board: Provided, 
That in case the matter in dispute shall involve the 
forfeiture of membership of a League club during the 
playing season, the Board shall, if appealed to by such 
club through the Secretary of the League, forthwith 
determine the matter, but, in such case, the members 
of the Board shall (unless the ends of justice may 
seem to them to require a meeting) determine such 
question by conference with each other by written cor- 
respondence. 

player's appeal from his club. 

Sec 3. The Board shall also be the sole tribunal for 
the hearing of an appeal made by any player who shall 
have been expelled or suspended by his club, or for an 
alleged breach of contract. The matter shall be pro- 
ceeded with in the following manner: The player 
shall file with the Secretary a written statement of his 
defense, accompanied by a request that an appeal be 
allowed him. The Secretary shall notify the club of 
the request for appeal, accompanying such notice with 
a copy bf the players statement, and at the next an 
nual meeting the club and the player shall appear 
before the Board with their testimony. The Board 
shall impartially hear the matter and render their de- 
cision, which shall be final and forever binding on 
both club and player. In the event the club appealed 
from is represented in the Board, that representative 
shall not be allowed to- sit in the matter. 

EXPENSES. 

Sec. 4. The expense of all trials and arbitrations 
shall be equally borne by the parties litigant. 



■SB 



44 CONSTITUTION OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE 

ARTICLE IX. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Section 1. The annual meeting of the League 
shall be held on the first Wednesday after the first 
Tuesday in December of each year, at twelve o'clock 
noon, and at such place as shall be determined by vote 
at the previous annual meeting. The annual meeting 
shall not be held in any citv where a club member of 
the League is located, but shall be held in some easily 
accessible place, and, as near as may be, equidistant 
from the several club members. 

Sec. 2. At such meeting each club shall be en- 
titled to two representatives; but no club shall be 
permitted to send as a representative any person under 
contract or engagement with it as a ball player and 
belonging to the nine of such club in said capacity; 
they shall present a certificate from the President nr 
Secretary of their club, showing their authority to act; 
but no club shall have more than one vote. 



QUORUM. 

A representation of a majority of clubs shall con- 
stitute a quorum for the transaction of business, but a 
less number may adjourn from time to time until a 
quorum is obtained. 

Sec. 3. The following shall be the order of busi- 
ness. 

1. Reading minutes of last meeting. 

"'. Report of Board of Directors. 
Election of new members. 

4. Amendment of Constitution. 

5. Amendment of Playing Rules. 
G. Election of Officers. 

• 7. Miscellaneous business. 
8. Adjournment. 



OF PROFESSIONAL BASK BALL CLUBS. 



45 



ARTICLE X. 



PLAYING RULES. 



The League at its first meeting shall ad< pt a code of 
Playing Rules, which may be altered, amended or 
abolished at any subsequent annual meeting. 

ARTICLE XL 

CONTRACTS. 

Section 1. Contracts hereafter made between the 
clubs, members of this League, and their players, shall 
be made under and in view of the following pro- 
visions: 

CONTRACTS MAY BE MADE AT ANY TIME. 

No club shall be prevented from contracting with a 
player for the reason that he is already under contract 
with another club: Provided!} The services to be 
rendered under the second contract is not to begin 
until the expiration of the first contract. * 

o The contract must be executed in the form adopted 
by the League, and the Secretary of the League shall, 
upon application, furnish each League club a suitable 
supply of the printed forms of contract adopted by 
the League. 

SECRETARY'S CERTIFICATE REQUIRED. 

Si:o. 2. It shall be the duty of a club as soon as it 
shall have entered into a contract with a player, to 
transmit said contract to the Secretary of the League. 
If the Secretary shall find the contract to be in the 
form adopted by the League, he shall endorse upon it 
his certificate to that effect, together with the date of 
its receipt by him, and at once return it to the con- 
tracting club. 

• The Secretary shall also enter upon his records the 
names of the contracting club and player, and imme- 
diately notify all other League clubs of such contract. 
In no case shall the Secretary give such certificate or 
give notice of such contract unless it comply, in all 



16 



CONSTITUTION OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE 



respects, with the form of contract adopted by the 
League, and no contract shall be regarded as valid or 
binding until it bears the Secretary's certificate as 
herein provided. 

SUSPENSION, EXPULSION OR RELEASE. 

Sec. 3. Whenever a club releases a player from his 
contract, or suspends or expels him, that club shall at 
once notify the Secretary of the League in writing, 
stating, in case of suspension or expulsion, the cause 
thereof, and the Secretary shall forthwith notify all 
other clubs. 

A player who has been released from his contract 
without suspension or expulsion, may engage with any 
other club twenty days from the date of the reception 
by the Secretary of the notice of such release. 

No player who has been suspended or expelled from 
a League club shall, at any time thereafter, be allowed 
to play with any League club (either the one expell- 
ing him or any other), unless the term of suspension 
has expired, or upon his appeal to the Board such sus- 
pension or expulsion shall have been set aside. 

Sec 4. A player whose contract has expired or 
become void by reason of his club's disbanding, with- 
drawing from or losing its membership in the League, 
may engage for the remainder of the season with any 
other League club. 

ARTICLE XIL 



CHAMPIONSHIP. 

Section 1. The Championship of the United 
States, established' by this League, shall be contended 
for (by the clubs composing this League) under the 
following rules, namely: 

The championship seasoyi shall extend from the 1st 
day of May to (and including) the 1st day of October, 
and no game shall count in the championship series 
unless played during the championship season. 



OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 



47 



No game played on Sunday shall count in the cham- 
pionship, series. 

Sec. "Z. Every game played between two clubs 
from the commencement of the championship season 
to the completion of the championship series, between 
such clubs, shall be a game for the championship (un- 
less played on Sunday), and no League club shall lend 
or exchange players, to or with each other, for any 
game played durmg the championship season. 

NUMBER OF GAMES TO BE PLAYED — POSTPONED OR 
TIE GAMES. 

Sec. 3. Each club shall play the following number 
of games with every other club: If six clubs be mem- 
bers of the League on the first day of the champion- 
ship season, sixteen games; if eight clubs,* twelve 
games; if ten clubs, ten games; Provided^ however, 
that if any game be prevented by rain, or if a tie or 
drawn game be played, the visiting club shall play off 
such tie or drawn game, or game prevented by rain, 
on the first succeeding day (not counting Sundays, 
days previously agreed upon for championship games 
between said clubs, or days when rain renders playing 
impossible), unless such succeeding day must neces- 
sarily be occupied by such visiting club intraveling to 
another city to play a championship game with another 
League club upon a day previously agreed upon; in 
which latter case, only the visiting club shall not be 
required to extend its stay, or to again visit such city 
for the sole purpose of playing oil' such tie or drawn 
game, or game prevented by rain. 

Sec, 4. Each club shall be entitled to have half of 
the championship series of games with every other 
club played on its own grounds, and in all the details 
of such games that do not involve the rights of the 
visiting club, under the Playing Rules, but relate 
solely to such games as attractive exhibitions to the 
patrons of the home club, the visiting club shall defer 
to the wishes of the home club. 



48 



CONSTITUTION OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE 



o. 5. All games shall be arranged for in writing, 
and so as to complete the championship series bcl'ore 
the expiration of the championship season. Each 

ement to play shall provide for an equal numl 
of return games, and specify dates for each game cov- 
I by the agreement, which dates shall subsequently 
be changed only as provided in Sec. 3 of this Article, 
or by the written consent of all parties to such agree- 
ment. 

Sec. G. No game shall be played between League 
clubs before the commencement of the championship 
series. No game shall be played between any League 
club and any Non-League club or picked nine, upon 
the grounds of any League club, from the commence- 
ment to the completion of the championship series 
upon such grounds; no game shall be arranged or 
played between any League and Non-League clubs or 
picked nines for or upon any "off days" of the 
championship scries, except as above provided, and 
upon the following express conditi 

1st. If a League championship game be prevented 
by rain or unavoidable accident on the day (not count- 
ing Sunday) preceding the day agreed upon for such 
i\ on -League or picked nine game, then the latter shall 
be declared off, so as to allow the League clubs ^o 
play the championship game on that day. 

2d. All such games shall be played under the Play- 
ing Rules of the League, with a League ball to be 
furnished by the League club. 

roun:iTi;i> <;am 

Sec, 7. A club shall he entitled to forfeited games 
— to count in its series as games won by a score of 
nine runs to none — in cases where the umpire in any 
championship game shall award the game to such cl 
on account of the violation by the contesting club of 
any playing rule of this League. 

Sec. 8.* Drawn, tie and postponed games shall not 
count in the series in favor of either contestant, but 



OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 



49 



must ho played off, if possible^ as provided in See. 3 
of this Article. 1£ they cannot be played off as there- 
in provided, they may subsequently be played off if 
sufficient time exist before the close of the season. 

SeO. 9. The club which shall have won the greatest 
number of games in the championship series shall be 
declared the champion club of the United States for 
the season in which such games were played. In the 
•it that two or more clubs shall have won the same 
number of games, then the club which shall have lost 
the smallest number sh ill be declared the champion. 

The emblem of the championship shall be apennant 
(of the national colors), to cost not less than one hun- 
dred dollars ($100). It shall be inscribed with the 
motto, " Champion Base Ball Club of the United 
States," with the name of the club and the year in 
which the title was won; and the champion club shall 
be entitled to % the pennant until the close of the en- 
suing season. 

Sec. 10. The championship shall be decided in the 
following manner, namely: 

Within twenty-four hours after every match game 
played for the championship, the home club shall pre* 
pare and forward to the Secretary of the League a 
statement containing tie full score of the game, ac- 
ting to the system specified in the % 'PlayingHules," 
the date, place ^ where played, and the names of the 
clubs and umpire: Provided^ That no tie or drawn 
game shall be considered "a game" for any purpose, 
nor shall the score thereof be forwarded to the Secre- 
tary. 

At the close of the season, the Secretary shall pre- 
pare, a tabular statement of the games won and lost by 
each club, according to the statements so sent him 
(which statements -hall be the sole evidence in the 
matt"}-), and submit the same, with the statements so 
' him, to the Board, who shall make theaward in 
Writing, and report the same to the League at its an- 



50 



CONSTITUTION OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE 



nual meeting. In making the award the Board shall 
oonsider: 

1st. The tabular statement of the Secretary. 

2nd. Forfeited games. 

3rd. Games participated in by clubs which have 
withdrawn, disbanded or forfeited their membership 
without completing their championship series with all 
other League clubs; such games shall be counted to 
the following extent, namely: The Board shall ascer- 
tain the least number of championship games played 
by such club with any club remaining in the League, 
and shall, from the first games participated in during 
the championship season, by such retired club, count 
in the series of each League club a similar number of 
games, and all other games participated in by such re- 
tired club shall not be counted in the championship 
series: * Provided, That if such retired club shall have 
failed to play at least one championship game with 
every League club, all games participated in by it 
shall be thrown out entirely. 

PRICE OF ADMISSION. 

4th. The price of admission to championship games 
shall be fifty cents for each adult person. 

ARTICLE XIII. 

THE LEAGUE ALLIANCE. 

Section 1. Clubs whose organization and conduct 
are not inconsistent with the objects of this League, 
as expressed in Article II of its Constitution, and who 
are also eligible under the provisions of this Article, 
and who shall have fded with the Secretary of the 
League an agreement duly executed in the following 
form, shall be recognized as constituting " The League 
Alliance." 

FORM OF " LEAGUE ALLIANCE " AGREEMENT. 

It is hereby Agreed by the Parties hereto, as follows: 
1st. No club that is a party hereto shall employ or 



OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 51 

play in its nine any player to whose services any other 
club that is a party hereto may be entitled by con- 
tract. 

2d. Any player under contract with any club that 
is a party hereto, who shall, without the written con- 
sent of such club, leave its service, or fail to perform 
his contract, or who shall be proven guilty of disrepu- 
table conduct, shall be at once expelled by such club. 

3d. No club that is a party hereto shall play any 
game of ball with any base ball club whatever that 
shall employ or present in its nine any player that shall 
have been expelled from any club that is a party here- 
to for breach of contract or disreputable conduct. 

4th. Each club that is a party hereto shall, upon 
making a contract with a player, immediately notify 
the Secretary of the National League of Professional 
Base Ball Clubs, such notice to be in writing, signed 
by the contracting club and the player, and, in the ab- 
sence of such notice to such officer, any player shall 
be deemed to be free from contract obligation. 

5th. Each club that is a party hereto shall, upon 
expelling a player from membership, or releasing 
him from contract, notify the Secretary of the Na- 
tional League of Professional Base Ball Clubs, and in 
the absence of such notice to such officer, such player 
shall be deemed to be a member in good standing of 
the club whose notice of contract with such player had 
previously been transmitted to such officer, until the 
expi ration of the term of such contract. 

Oth. The notices provided for in the two last pre- 
ceding stipulations are required to be sent to the Sec- 
retary of the League, upon the understanding that 
such officer will, immediately upon their receipt, com- 
municate the same to all League clubs, as well as to 
all clubs that are parties to this agreement; and in the 
event of a failure or refusal of such officer to perform 
such service, or his discontinuance thereof, then the 
parties hereto shall devise other means for the per- 
formance of such service. 



5*S£= 



52 



CONSTITUTION OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE 



7th. All games played by the clubs that are par- 
ties hereto shall be played in accordance with the Play- 
ing Rules of the National League. 

8th. All disputes that may arise between the clubs 
..»at are parties hereto may be submitted to the Board 
of Directors of the National League for adjudication, 
in the manner provided for by Section IV, Article 
XIII, of its Constitution, and the finding of such 
tribunal shall be final and binding upon the clubs that 
are parties hereto. 

9th. This agreement shall go into effect and be 
binding upon each club upon the date of its signature 
by such club. 

10th. Each club that is a party hereto shall retain 
a copy of this agreement, and the original shall be de- 
posited with tW Secretary of the National League. 

In Witness Whereof, The clubs that are parties 
hereto have, by their duly authorized representative, 
signed this agreement on the dates entered opposite 
their respective signatures. 

By 



18. 



The Secretary of the " National League of Profes- 
sional Base Ball Clubs " is hereby authorized to attach 
the foregoing instrument, bearing our signature, to the 
original written agreement, of the said text, now in 
his custody, for the purpose of making the same a part 
and parcel of such original agreement, binding our- 
selves and all other clubs parties thereto. 

By 



18. 



Sec. 2. Each League Alliance Club shall pay to 
the Secretary of the League, on or before the first day 
of May of each year, the sum of ten dollars, to pay 
for postage, correspondence, printing and other ex- 
penses, and any such club failing to pay said sum by 
such time shall thereby forfeit all the benefits of this 



OF PROFESSIONAL BASK BALL CLUBS. '53 

Article, and the Secretary shall at once notify all 
League and League Alliance Clubs of such forfeiture. 

Sec. 3. The Secretary shall issue to all League and 
League Alliance Clubs the notices provided for'in the 
sixth clause of the League Alliance Agreement, and 
shall perform such other duties as may devolve upon 
him in fuitherance of the provisions of said agree- 
ment. 

Sec. 4. The Board shall, if thereunto requested by 
League Alliance Clubs, adjudicate disputes in the 
manner provided in Article VIII, so far as the provis- 
ions of that Article may be applicable thereto: Pro- 
ridedy That all communications must be addressed to 
the Secretary of the League. 

Sec. 5. No League club shall employ or play in 
its nine any player to whose services any League Al- 
liance Club is entitled by contract evidenced by writ- 
ten notice to the Secretary, signed by the contracting 
club and the player. 

Sec. 6. The League shall, at its annual meeting, 
receive and consider any communication from a club 
or clubs of the League Alliance on matters effecting 
the interest of such club or clubs, and shall give a 
hearing to any delegation or delegations therefrom. 

Sec. 7. The Secretary shall receive and place on 
file the score of any game played between two League 
Alliance Clubs that may be forwarded to him, bearing 
the certificate of the umpire of such game, and stat- 
ing the names of each club, the number of runs made 
by each, and number of innings played, and at the 
close of the season, the Secretary shall prepare a tabu- 
lar statement of such games, according to the state- 
ment so sent him (which statement shall be the sole 
evidence in the matter), and submit the same, with the 
statements so sent him, to the Board, who shall award 
the League Alliance Championship to the club which 
shall have won the greatest number of such games. 
The Board shall make the award in writing, and re- 
port the same to the League at its annual meeting, 



54 



CONSTITUTION OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE 



and the League shall, thereupon, present such club 
with a suitable emblem of such championship. 

Sec. 8. No club that has forfeited its membership 
in the League, or that is connected with any organiza- 
tion of clubs other than the League or League Alli- 
ance, or that presents in its nine any player expelled 
from the League or League Alliance, shall be entitled 
to the benefits of this Article, and the Secretary shall 
notify all League and League Alliance Clubs of any 
forfeiture of such benefits that may be incurred by the 
violation of any provision of this section. 

ARTICLE XIV. 

FIELD KULES. 

Every club in this League shall be bound by the fol- 
lowing Field Rules, and must have the same conspic- 
uously posted or placarded upon its grounds, namely: 
No club shall allow open betting or pool selling upon 
its grounds, nor in any building owned or occupied by 
it. - No person shall be allowed upon any part of the 
field during the progress of the game, in addition to 
the nine players on each side and the umpire, except 
such officers of the law as may be present in uniform 
to preserve the peace. 

Players in uniform shall not be permitted to seat 
themselves among the spectators. 

The umpire is the sole judge of play, and is entitled 
to the respect of the spectators, and any person hissing 
or hooting at, or offering any insult or indignity to him, 
must be promptly ejected from the grounds. 

Every club shall furnish sufficient police force 
upon its own grounds to preserve order, and in the 
event of a crowd entering the field during the pro- 
gress of a game, and interfering with the play in any 
manner, the visiting club may refuse to play further 
until the field be cleared; and if the ground be not 
cleared within fifteen minutes thereafter, the 'visiting 
club may claim, and shall be entitled, to the game by 



OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BAXL CLUBS. 



55 



a score of nine runs to none (no matter what number 
of innings have been played). 

ARTICLE XV. 

AMENDMENT?. 

The Constitution or Playing Rules of this League 
may be altered or amended by a two-thirds vote of the 
League at any annual meeting. 



INDEX 



TO 



RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



THE MATERIALS OF THE GAME. 

RULE, 

The Ground 1 

The Jnfield 2 

The Bases 3 

The Foul Lines 4 

The Pitcher's Lines g 

The Catcher's Lines. 6 

The Captain's Lines 7 

The Players 1 Lines 8 

The Batsman's Lines : I 

The Lines must be marked 10 

The Bal 1 . 11 

of what composed . (1) 11 

furnished by Home Club c 

replaced if injured . (0) ] 1 

lost (4) 11 

The Bat 12 

THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS. 

Players must be Nine on each side 13 

Players positions 14 

in the field (1) 14 

at the bat . (2) 14 

Batsman's position .(3) 14 

" privilege ; .(4) 14 

DEFINITIONS. 

AHighBall . 15 

A Low Ball 10 

A High or Low Ball 17 

A Fair Ball is 

An Unfair Ball. t!) 

A Bal k 20 

A Foul Balk %\ 

A Dead Ball 22 

A Fair Hit 2:) 

50 



PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 



57 



DEFINITIONS.— Continued. 

RULE. 

A Foul Hit.... 24 

A Strike 25 

A Foul Strike . . . : - 26 

Play 2? 

Time 28 

Game 29 

An Inning 30 

A time at bat 81 

Legal or Legally. 32 

THE GAME. 

Number of Innings 33 

Drawn Game $4 

Forfeited Game. 

"No Game" 86 

Substitute for Player 87 

Choice of first Innings 38 

Games must begin " Play » 39 

» il be suspended " Time " 39 

Rain \ 33 

( . 34 

Batsman must call for ball lie wants 40 

When Umpire must call Unfair Balls 40 

u « " Strikes . . 40 

When Batsman is out . 41 

« « becomes Base-Runner 42 

Base-Runner must touch bases in order 43 

« « entitled to hold base 43 

«* m entitled. to take one base 44 

When Base-Runner may have substitute to run 45 

When Base-Runner is out. 40 

When Umpire shall declare player out 47 

Dead Ball, effect of . .. 48 

When run shall be scored 49 

Fines on Pitcher 50 

" any Player 59 

PI ayer not to address Umpire 51 

ft « " Audience.... ' 52 

» u use Improper Language 59 

" to obey Umpire's Order 59 

Field must be kept clear 53 



38 



INDEX TO RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



THE UMPIRE. 

BUXE." 

Selection of Umpire 54 

Umpire's Duties. . 55 

Special Ground Rules (1) 55 

Reversal of Decision (2) 55 

To Determine a Catch (3) 55 

Notice of Fine. .* W j 55 

Notice of Forfeited Game (4) 55 

Umpire shall be paid by 56 

" " not be changed, except 57 

u " be expelled 'if 68 

Umpire's Jurisdiction and Powers 59 

Scoring. 60 

CONSTRUCTION AND AMENDMENT. 

Construction of Rules 61 

Amendment of Rules. 62 



PLAYING RULES 



NATIONAL LEAGUE 



PROFESSIONAL BASE-BALL CLUBS 



I88O. 



CLASS I. 
THE MATERIALS OF THE GAME. 

Rule 1. The Ground must be an inclosed field, 
sufficient in size to enable each player to play in bis 
position as required by these Rules. 

Rule 2. The Infield must be a space of ground 
thirty yards square. 

Rule 3. The Bases must be 

(1) Four in number, and designated as First Base, 
Second Base, Third Base and Home Base. 

(2) The Home Base must be of white marble or 
white stone, twelve inches square, so fixed in the 
ground as to be even with the surface, and so placed 
in a corner of the infield that two of its sides will form 
part of the boundaries of said infield. 

(3) The First, Second and Third Bases must be 
canvas bags, fifteen inches square, painted white, and 
filled with some soft material, and so placed that the 
center of each shall be upon a separate corner of the 
infield, the First Base at the right, the Second Base 
opposite, and the Third Base at the left of the Home 
Base. 

(4) All the Bases must be securely fastened in their 
positions, and so placed as to be distinctly seen by the 
Umpire. 

59 



60 rLAYING RULES OF TUB NATIONAL LBAGUB 

Rule 4. The Foul Lines must be drawn in 

straight lines from the outer corner of the Home Base 
through the center of the positions of First and Third 
Bases" to the boundaries of the Ground. 

Rule 5 The Pitcher's Lines must be straight 

lines forming the boundaries of a space ot ground, in 
the infield, 'six feet long by four feet Wide, distant 
forty-five feet from the center of the Home Base, a 
so placed that the six feet lines would each be two I 
distant from and parallel with a straight line passing 
tlirouo-h the center of the Home and Second Bases. 
Each e corner of this space must be marked by a fiat 
iron plate or stone, six inches square, fixed in the 
a-round even with the surface. 
3 Rule 6 The Catcher's Lines must be drawn 
from the outer corner of the Home Base, in continu- 
ation of the Foul Lines, straight to the limits of the 
uround back of the Home Base. 

Rule 7 The Captain's Lines must be drawn 
from the Catcher's Lines to the limits of the ground, 
fifteen feet from and parallel with the Foul Lines. 

Rule 8. The Players' Lines must be drawn 

from the Catcher's Lines to the limits of the ground, 
fifty feet from and parallel with the Foul Lines. _ 

Rule 9 The Batsman's Lines must be st raight 
lines forming the boundaries of a space on the .: 
a„d of a similar space on the left of the Home J> 
six feet long by three feet wide, extending tnrec 
in front of and three feet behind the center of the 
Home Base, and with its nearest line distant one loot 
from the Home Base. , 

Rule 10. The lines designated in Rules 4, 5, 
6 7, 8, and must be marked with chalk or otner suit- 
able material so as to be distinctly seen by the Urn- 
n i,e They must all bo so marked their entire cngth, 
excent the Captain's and Players' Lines, which must 
be so marked for a distance of at least thirty-hvo yards 
from the Catcher's T/ncs. 






OF PKOFESSIONAL BASK BALL CLUBS. 



61 



Rule 11. The Ball 

(1) Must weigh not less than five nor more than 
five and one-quarter ounces avoirdupois, and measure 
not less than nine nor more than nine and one-quarter 
inches in circumference. It must be composed of 
woolen yarn, and contain not more than one ounce of 
vulcanized rubber in mold form, and be covered with 
leather. It must be furnished by the Secretary of the 
League, whose seal shall be final evidence of the legal- 
ity of the ball. 

(2) In all games the ball or balls played with shall 
be furnished by the Home Club and become tho prop- 
erty of the winning club. 

(3) Should the ball become out of shape, or cut or 
ripped so as to expose the yarn, or in any way so in- 
jured as to be unfit for fair use, a new ball shall be 
called for by the Umpire at the end of an even in- 
nings.* 

(4) Should the ball be lost during the game, the Um- 
pire shall, at the expiration of five minutes, call for a 
new ball. 

Rule 12. The Bat 

(1) Must be made wholly of wood. 

(2) It must be round; must not exceed two and 
one-half inches in diameter in the thickest part, and 
must not exceed forty-two inches in length. 

CLASS II. 

THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS. 

Rule 13. The Players of each club, in a match 
game, shall be nine in number, one of whom shall be 
the Captain. 

Rule 14. The Players' Positions shall be 

(1) When in the field (designated " Fielders " in 
these Rules) such as may be assigned them by their 

*The l< Spalding League Ball " having been adopted as the official ball, 
all match games played under the League rule?, this ball aud nonto 
can be legally used. 



62 PLAYING «ULES OK THE NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Captain, except that the Pitcher must take his posi- 
tion within the Pitcher's Lines, as defined in Rule &. 
1 2) When their side is at the bat they must remain 
ouUde the Players' Lines as defined in Rule 8 ex 
rp-nt that the Captain and one assistant only may oc 
?u?ytt»aoa between said Players' L-es a, ; d tl 
Captain's Lines, as defined in Rule 7, to coach 

1^ Batsmen must take their PfJ-^gj 

Ba M?' No olaver of the side at bat, except when 
BilaS .hKciy any portion of the space within 
the Catcher's Lines as defined in Rule u. 

CLASS III. 
DEFINITIONS. 

Pnl a 1 «5 A Hiffh Ball is a ball legally delivered 
by^P.l^r, ov?rfhe Hoa.eBase,^ than the 
belt of the Batsman, but not higher than his shoulder. 

Riil a 1 6 A LOW Ball is a ball legally delivered 
by^ePitcher, overdo Ho- Base not higher than 
the Batsman's belt nor lower than his knee. 

Pnle 17 A Hiffb or Low Ball is a ball legally 
delhSed by the Pfcher, over the Home Base, no 
Sigher thanthe Batsman's shoulder nor lower than his 

"prila 1 ft A Fair Ball is a ball delivered by the 
PiK while whonfwShkT the lines of his pos.tion 
and facing the Busman, with his arm swingmg nearly 
perpendicular by his side and his band ff-^Jj 
his waist, and the ball pa»in» over the Home Base at 
the height called for by tho Batsman. 

Rule 19. " An Unfair Ball is a ball delivered by 
thePitcher as in Rule 18, except that the ball does 



mHmmmfmmamm 



OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALI* CLUBS. 63 

not pass over the Homo Base, or does not pass over 
the I'lomo Base at the height called for by the Bats- 
man. 

Rule 20. A Balk is 

(1) A motion made by tho Pitcher to deliver the 
ball to the bat without delivering it, 0XC8pt the ball 
be accidentally dropped, or 

(2) Tiie bad be held by the Pitcher so long as to 
delay the game unnecessarily, or 

(:>) Delivered to the bat by the Pitcher when any 
part of his person is upon ground outside the lines of 
his position. 

Rule 21. A Foul Balk is a ball delivered to the 
bat by the Pitcher by an overhand throw, or by any 
swing of the arm or hand other than that prescribed in 
Rule 18. 

Rule 22. A Dead Ball is a ball delivered to the 
bat by the Pitcher, that touches the Batsman's bat 
without being struck at, or any part of the Batsman's 
person while standing in his position, or any part of 
the Umpire's person without first passing the Catcher. 

Rule 23. A Fair Hit is a ball batted by the 
Batsman, Btanding in his position, that first touches 
the ground, the First Base, the Third Base, the person 
of a player, or any other object, in front of or on either 
of the Foul Lines; or (Exception) batted directly to 
the ground by the Batsman; standing in his position, 
that (whether it first touches Foul or Fair Ground) 
bounds or rolls within the Foul Lines between Homo 
and First or Home and Third Bases without first touch- 
ing the person of a player. 

Rule 24. A Foul Hit is a ball hatted by the 
Batsman, standing in his position, that first touches the 
ground, the person of a player, or any other object, 
behind either of the Foul Lines, or {Exception) batted 
directly to the ground by the Batsman, standing in his 

Sosition, that (whether it first touches Foul or Fair 
rround) bounds or rolls outside tho Foul Lines, bo- 



04 PLAYING BULKS OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE 

tween Home and First, or Home and Third Bases, with- 
out first touching the person of a player. 

Rule 25. A Strike is 

(1) A ball struck at by the Batsman without it 
touching his bat, or 

(2) A ball legally delivered by the Pitcher at the 
height called for by the Batsman, and over the Home 
Base, but not struck at by the Batsman. 

Rule 26. A Foul Strike is a ball batted by the 
Batsman when any part of his person is upon ground 
outside the lines of the Batsman's position. 

Rule 27. Play is the order of the Umpire to be- 
gin the game, or to resume play after its suspension. 

Rule 28. Time is the order of the Umpire to 
suspend play. Such suspension must not extend be- 
yond the day of the game. 

Rule 29. Game is the announcement by the 
Umpire that the game is terminated. 

Rule 30. An Inning is the turn at bat of the 

nine players representing a Club in a game, and is 
completed when three of such players have been put 
out as provided in these Rules. 

Rule 31. A time at bat is the term at bat of 
a batsman. It begins when he takes his position, and 
continues until he is put out or becomes a base runner. 

Rule 32. Legal, Or Legally, signifies as re- 
quired by these rules. 

CLASS IV. 

THE GAME. 

Rule 33. A Game shall consist of nine imiinga 
to each contesting nine, except that: 

(1) If the side first at bat scores less runs in nine 
innings than the other side has scored hi eight iiuii 
the game shall then terminate. 

(2) If the side last at bat in the ninth innings 



twp&mm 



***** 



OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BAIX CLUBS. 



65 



scores the winning run before the third man is out, 
the game shall then terminate. 

(3) If the score be a tie at the end of nine innings 
to each side, play shall only be continued until the 
side first at bat shall have scored one or more runs 
than the other side, in an equal number of innings; 
Or until the other side shall score one more run 
than the side first at bat. 

(1) If the Umpire calls "game" on account of 
darkness or rain at any time after five innings have 
been completed by both sides, the score shall be that 
of the last equal innings played, unless the side sec- 
ond at bat shall have scored one or more runs than the 
side first at bat, in which case the score of the game 
shall be the total number of runs made. 

Rule 34. A Drawn Game shall be declared by 
the Umpire when he terminates a game, on account of 
darkness or rain, after five equal innings have been 
played, if the score at the time is equal on the last 
erven innings played: but (Exception) if the side that 
went second to bat is then at the bat, and has scored 
the same number of runs as the other side, the Umpire 
shall declare the game drawn, without regard to the 
score of the last equal innings. 

Rule 35. A Forfeited Game shall be declared 
by the Umpire, in favor of the Club not in fault, in 
the following cases: 

(1) If the Nine of a Club fail to appear upon the 
Field, or, being upon the Field, fail to begin the game, 
within five minutes after the Umpire has called a Play " 
at the hour appointed for the beginning of a game. 

(2) If, after the game has begun, one side refuses 
or fails to continue playing, unless such game has 
been suspended or terminated by the Umpire. 

(:3) If, after play has been suspended by the Um- 
pire, one side fails to resume playing within five min- 
utes after the Umpire has called "Play. 11 

(4) If the Umpire calls three Foul Balks in one 



66 PLAYING BULKS OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE 

inning and has warned the Pitcher of the penalty after 
the second Foul Balk and before the third is called. 

(5) If, in the opinion of the Umpire, any one of 
these Rules is willfully violated. 

Rule 36. "No Game" shall be declared by the 
Umpire if he shall terminate play, on account ot ram 
or darkness, before five innings on each side are com- 
pleted* 

Rule 37. A Substitute shall not be allowed to 
take the place of any player in a game, after the com- 
mencement of the second inning of the side first at 
bat, unless such player be disabled, in the game then 
being played, by reason of illness or injury. 

Rule 38. The Choice of First Innings shall 
be determined by the two Captains. 

Rule 39. The Game must begin when the 
Umpire calls "Play. When he calls -Time," play 
shall be suspended until he calls "Play" again, and 
during the interim no player shall be put out, base bo 
run, o°r run be scored. The Umpire shall suspend play 
only for an accident to himself or a player, or m case 
rain falls so heavily that, in his opinion, the game can- 
not fairly proceed, in which case he shall note the time 
of suspension, and, should such rain continue to fall 
thirty minutes thereafter, he shall terminate the game. 
The ^Umpire shall also declare every "dead ball, 
"foul hit," "foul strike," "balk" and "foul balk," 
and after declaring the second "foul balk" in one 
inning shall warn the Pitcher of the penalty prescribed 
by Rule 35, (4.) 

Rule 40. The Batsman, on taking his posi- 
tion, must call for a "high ball," a "low ball,' or a 
" high or low ball," and the Umpire shall notify the 
Pitcher to deliver the ball as required; such call shall 
not be changed after the first ball delivered. The 
npire shall count and call every " unfair ball" de- 
livered by the Pitcher, and every "foul balk" and 
"dnad ball" if also an "unfair ball" as a "ball; 



"PRW^jl 



OT PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CUTBS. 6? 

and he shall also count and call every a strike," ex- 
cept that, after two strikes have been called, should 
the Batsman fail to strike at the next fair ball, the 
Umpire shall omit the couui in that instance only, but 
shall warn the Batsman by calling "good ball," 
Neither a " ball " nor a "strike" shall be called or 
counted until the ball has passed the Home Base, 

Rule 41. The Batsman is out 

(1) If lie fails to. take his position at the bat in his 
order of batting, unless the error be discovered and 
the proper Batsman takes his position before a fair hit 
has been made. 

(2) If he fails to take his position within one min- 
ute after the Umpire has called for the Batsman. 

(3) If he makes a foul hit and the ball be momen- 
tarily bejel by a fielder before touching the ground, or 
after touching the ground but once, provided it be not 
caught in a fielder's hat or cap, or touch some object 
other than the fielder before touching the ground or 
before being caught. 

(4) If he makes a foul strike. 

(5) If he plainly attempts to hinder the Catcher 
from catching the ball, evidently without effort to 
make a fair hit. 

Rule 42. The Batsman becomes a* Base 
Runner 

(1) AVhen he makes a fair hit. 

(2) When eight balls have been called by the 
Umpire. 

(3) When three strikes have been declared by the 
Umpire. 

Rule 43. The Base Runner must touch 
each Base in regular order, viz: First, Second, 
Third, and Home Bases, and when obliged to return 
must retouch the base or bases in reverse order... He 
shall only be considered as holding a base after touch- 
ing it, and shall then be entitled to hold such base 
until he has legally touched the next base in order, or 



. 



68 



PLAY1XG RULES OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE 



has been legally forced to vacate it for a succeeding 
Base-Runner, 

Rule 44. The Base-Runner shall be en- 
titled, without being put out, to take one 
Base, provided he do so on the run, in the fol- 
lowing cases: 

(1) If, while he was Batsman, the Umpire called 
eight balls. 

(2) If the Umpire awards a succeeding Batsman a 
base on eight balls, and the Base-Runner is thereby 
forced to vacate the base held by him. 

If the Umpire calls a Balk. 
If a ball delivered by the Pitcher pass the 
Catcher and touch any fence or building within ninety 
feet of the Home Base. 

(5) If he be prevented from making a base by the 
obstruction of an adversary. 

(G) If a Fielder stop or catch a batted ball with his 
hat or any part of his dress. 

(7) If a batted or thrown ball be stopped by 
any person not engaged in the game, and, in such case, 
the ball shall not be considered in play until it is held 
by the Pitcher standing in his position. 

Rule 45. The Base-Runner may have a 
Substitute run for him, in case of illness or in- 

i'ury incurred in the game then being played, provided 
to has reached First Base, and in such case, the oppsing 
Captain shall select such substitute from the side at 
bat. 

Rule 46. The Base-Runner is out 
(i) l^, having made a fair hit while Batsman, such 
fair hit ball be momentarily held by a Fielder, before 
touching the ground or any object other than a Fielder, 
provided it be not caught in the Fielder's hat or cap. 
(2) If, when the Umpire has declared three strikes 
on him while Batsman, the third strike ball be mo- 
mentarily held by a Fielder before touching the 
ground; provided it be not caught in a Fielder's hat 



OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 



69 



or cap, or touch some object other than a Fielder be- 
fore being caught. 

(3) If, after three strikes or a fair hit, he be touched 
with the ball in the hand of a Fielder before such 
Base-Runner touches First Base, 

(4) If, after three strikes or a fair hit, the ball be 
securely held by a Fielder, while touching First Base 
with any part of his person, before such Base-Runner 
touches First Base. 

(5) If, after three strikes, eight balls, or a fair hit, 
he fails to run to First Base, 

(G) If, in running to First Base, he runs inside the 
Foul Line or more than three feet outside of it, except 
that he must do so if necessary to avoid a Fielder at- 
tempting to field a batted ball, and in such case shall 
not be declared out. 

(7) If, in running from First to Second Base, from 
Second to Third Base, or from Third to Home Base, 
he runs more than three feet from a direct line between 
such bases to avoid being touched by the ball in the 
hands of a Fielder; but in case a Fielder be occupy- 
ing the Base-Runner's proper path, attempting to field 
a batted ball, then the Base-Runner shall run out of 
the path and behind said Fielder, and shall not be de- 
clared out for so doing. 

(S) If he fails to avoid a Fielder attempting to field 
a batted ball, in the manner prescribed in (G) and (7) 
of this Rule, or if he, in any way, obstructs a Fielder 
attempting to field a batted ball. 

(9) If, at any time while the ball is in play, he be 
touched by the ball in the hand of a Fielder, unless 
some part of his person is touching abase he is entitled 
to occupy, provided the ball be held by the Fielder 
after touching him; but {exception as to First Base) in 
running to First Base he may over-run said base with- 
out being put out for being off said base, after first 
touching it, provided he returns at once and retouches 
the base, after which ho may be put ou* as at any 
other base/' If, in overrunning First Base, he also at- 



70 



PLAYINQ EULE3 Off TUB NATIONAL LEAGUE 



tempts to run to Second Base, he shall forfeit such ex- 
emption from being put out. 

(10) If, when a Fair or Foul Hit ball is legally 
caught by a Fielder before it touches the ground, such 
ball is legally held by a Fielder on the base occupied 
by the Base-Runner when such ball was struck (or the 
Base-Runner be touched with the ball in the hand of 
a Fielder), before he retouches said base after such Fair 
or Foul Hit Ball was so caught; provided. That the 
Base-Runner shall not be out in such case, if, after the 
ball was legally caught as above, it be delivered to the 
bat by the Pitcher before the Fielder holds it on the 
said base or touches the Base-Runner with it. 

(11) If, when the ball, from a Foul Hit, has struck 
the ground before being caught, or the Batsman has 
made a Foul Strike, the Base-Runner fails to retouch 
the base held by him when the ball was struck, after 
such ball has been returned to and held by the Pitcher 
standing in his position; provided,That,after the Bats- 
man makes such Foul Hit or Foul Strike, the Base-- 
Runner may return to said base without being declared 
out, if he do so on the run. 

(12) If, when a Batsman becomes a Base-Runner, 
[except as provided in Rule 43], the First Base, or the 
First and Second Bases, or the First, Second and Third 
Bases, be occupied, any Base-Runner so occupying a 
base shall cease to be entitled to hold it, until the 
Base-Runner running to First Base is put out, and 
may be put out at the next base or by being touched 
by the ball in the hand of a Fielder in the same man- 
ner as in running to First Base, at any time before the 
Base-Runner running to First Base is put out. 

(13) If a Fair Hit ball strike him he shall be de- 
clared out, and in such case no base shall be run un- 
less forced, and no run be scored. 

1 (14) If, when running to a base or forced to return 
to a base, he fail to touch the intervening base or 
bases, if any, in the order prescribed in Rule 42; pro- 
vided, That he shall not be declared out unless the Cap- 



OF PROFESSIONAL BASS BALL CLUBS. 71 

cain of the fielding side claim such decision before the 
ball is delivered to the bat by the Pitcher. 

Rule 47. The Umpire shall declare the 
Batsman or Base-Runner out, without wait- 
ing for an appeal for such decision, in all cases 
where such player is put out in accordance with these 
Rules, except as provided in Rule 46, (10) and (14). 

Rule 48. When a Dead Ball is declared by 
the Umpire, no player shall be put out, base be run, 
or. run be scored on such ball, unless such ball be also 
the eighth Unfair Ball, that entitles the striker to a 
base, ?n which case the striker shall take First Base, 
and any Base-Runner thereby forced to vacate a base 
shall take one base without being put out, and if a 
base thus taken be the Home Base the run shall be 
scored. 

Rule 49. One Run shall be scored every 

time a Base Runner, after having legally touched the 
first three bases, shall touch the Home Base before* 
three men are put out. If the third" man is forced out, 
or is put out before reaching First Base, a run shall 
not be scored. 

Rule 50. If the Pitcher causes the ball to 
Strike the Batsman, and the Umpire be satisfied 
that he does it intentionally, he shall fine the Pitcher 
therefor in a sum not less than Ten Dollars nor more 
than Fifty Dollars. 

Rule. 51. No Player, except the Captain 
or his assistant, shall address the Umpire 
concerning any point of play, and any violation of tins 
Rule shall subject the offender to a fine by the Um- 
pire. 

Rule 52. No Manager, Captain or Player 
shall address the audience during the progress 
of a game, except in case of necessary explanation. 

Rule 53. No person not engaged in the 
game shall be permitted to occupy any position within 



_ 



72 PLATING BUXES OF TUB NATIONAL LEAGUE. 

the lines of the Field, or to interfere in any way with 
the Umpire or the players during the progress of a 
game* 

CLASS V. 

THE UMPIRE. 

Rule 54. The Umpire shall be selected as 
follows: 

(1) Two clubs may, by mutual agreement, select 
any man to umpire any game or games, provided that 
such agreement be in writing, and the man so selected 
agrees not less than seven days before such game, or 
the first of such games, to act as such Umpire. 

(2) A staff of League Umpires shall be selected 
in the following manner: Prior to April 1st of each 
year, each club shall send to the Secretary the names 
of any persons of good repute and considered compe- 
tent to act as Umpires. A list of all persons so nom- 
inated shall be prepared by the Secretary and sub- 

. mitted to each club, which shall then select therefrom 
a number equal to three times the number of clubs 
then in the League, and shall transmit a list thereof to 
the Secretary, and the required number having the 
greatest number of approvals shall constitute the staff 
of League Umpires. 

The Board shall fill any vacancy caused by declina- 
tions, and shall appoint an Umpire to replace any that 
may be objected to in writing by three League clubs 
after the commencement of the championship season. 

(3) In the absence of the agreement provided for 
in Sec. 1 of this Rule, the Visiting Club shall, not less 
than five days before any Championship Game, submit 
by telegraph to the President or Secretary of the Homo 
Club the names of seven League Umpires, none of 
whom shall reside in the city of the Visiting Club. 
The Home Club shall then be charged with the duty 
of producing one of the seven so named upon the 
grounds in season for the game. 

(4) > In case the Visiting Club shall have failed to 



0» PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 



73 



furnish the seven names as provided in Sec. 3, the 
Home Club shall select an Umpire for such game; 
and in case the Visiting Club shall have furnished the 
seven names, as provided in Sec. 3, and the Home 
Club fails to produce one of the Umpires so named, 
within fifteen minutes before the hour appointed for 
the game, the Visiting Club shall select the Umpire^ 
who shall not be an employe of the Visiting Club. 

Rule 55. The Umpire's Duties, in addition to 
those specified in the preceding Rules, are 

(1) Before the commencement of a Match Game, 
the Umpire shall see that the rules governing all the 
materials of the game are strictly observed. He shall 
ask the Captain of the Home Club whether there are 
any special ground rules to be enforced, and, if there 
are, he shall see that they are duly enforced, provided 
they do not conflict with any of these Rules. He shall 
also ascertain whether the fence in the rear of the 
Catcher's position is distant ninety feet from the Home 
Base. 

(2) The Umpire shall not reverse his decision on 
any point of play upon the testimony of any player 
engaged in the game. 

(3) Should the Umpire be unable to see whether 
a catch has been fairly made, he shall be at liberty to 
appeal to the bystanders, and to render his decision 
accordingly. 

(4) In case the Umpire imposes a fine on a player, 
or declares a game forfeited, he shall transmit a writ- 
ten notice thereof to the Secretary of the League 
within twenty- four hours thereafter. 

Rule 56, The Visiting Club shall pay the 
fee and expenses of the Umpire of any championship 
game. 

Rule 57. The Umpire shall not be changed 
during the progress of a Match Game, except for 
reason of illness or injury, or by the consent of the 



HS 



74 PLAYING EULKtf Off THE NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Captains of the two contesting Nines, in case he shall 
have willfully violated any of these Rules, 

Rule 58. Any League Umpire who shall 
be convicted of selling, or offering to sell, a game 
of which he is Umpire, shall, thereupon, be removed 
from his oilicial capacity, and placed under the same 
disabilities inflicted on expelled players by the Consti- 
tution of the League. 

Rule 59. The Umpire's Jurisdictions and 
Powers, in addition to those specified in the preced- 
ing Rules, are: 

The gentleman selected to fill the position of Um- 
pire must keep constantly in mind the fact that upon 
his sound discretion and promptness in conducting the 
game, and compelling players to observe the spirit as 
well as the letter of the Rules, largely depends the 
merit of the game as an exhibition, and the satisfaction 
of spectators therewith, lie must make his decisions 
distinct and clear, remembering that every spectator 
is anxious to hear such decision. lie must keep the 
contesting nines playing constantly from the com- 
mencement of the game to its termination, allowing 
such delays only as are rendered unavoidable by acci- 
dent, injury or rain. He must, until the completion of 
the game, require the players of each side to promptly 
take their positions in the field as soon as the third 
hand is put out, and must require the first striker of 
the opposite side to be in his position at the bat as soon 
as the Fielders are in their places. 

The players of the side u at bat" must occupy the 
portion of the Field allotted them, subject to the con- 
dition that they must speedily vacate any portion 
thereof that may be in the way of the ball, or any 
Fielder attempting to catch or field it. The triangular 
Space behind the Home Base is reserved for the ex- 
clusive use of the Umpire, Catcher and Batsman, and 
the Umpire must prohibit any player of the side "at 
bat " from crossing the same at any time while the ball 



OF PllOFESSXOXAL. BASE BALL CLUBS. 



75 



is in the hands of or passing between the Pitcher or 
Catcher while standing in their positions. 

The Umpire is master of the Field from the com- 
mencement to the termination of the game, and must 
compel the players to observe trie provisions of all the 
Plaving Rules, and he is hereby invested with author- 
ity to order any player to do or omit to do any act 
necessary to give force and effect to any and all of such 
provisions, and power to inflict upon any player dis- 
obeying any such order a fine of not less than five or 
more than fifty dollars for each offense, and tc impose 
a similar fine upon any player who shall use abusive, 
threatening or improper language to the Umpire, audi- 
ence or other player, and when the Umpire shall have 
so punished the player, he shall not have the power to 
revoke or remit the penalty so inflicted. 

The Umpire shall, at once, notify the Captain of the 
offending player's side of the infliction of any fine 
herein provided for, and the club to which such player 
belong J shall, upon receipt of a notice of said fine from 
the Secretary of the League, within ten days, trans- 
mit the amount of such fine to the Secretary of the 
League. 

CLASS VI. 
SCORING. 

Rule 60. In Order to Promote Uniformity 
in Scoring Championship Games, the following in- 
structions, suggestions, and definitions are made for 
the benefit of scorers of League Clubs, and they are 
required to make the scores mentioned in Sec. 10, 
Article XII. of the League Constitution in accordance 
therewith. 

Batting. 

(1) The first item in the tabulated score, after the 
player's name and position, shall be the number of 
times he has been at bat during the game. Any time 
or times where the player has been sent to base on 
called balls shall not be included in this column. 



76 



PLAYING KULES OP THE NATIONAL LEAGUE 



(2) In the second column should be set down the 
runs made by each player. 

(3) In the third column should be placed the first 
base hits made by each player. A base hit should be 
scored in the following cases: 

When the ball from the bat strikes the ground be- 
tween the foul lines and out of reach of the fielders. 

When a hit is partially or wholly stopped by a fielder 
in motion; but such player cannot recover himself in 
time to handle the ball before the striker reaches First 
Base. 

When the ball is hit so sharply to an in fielder that 
he cannot handle it in time to put out a man. In case 
of doubt over this class of hits, score a base hit and 
exempt fielder from the charge of an error. 

When a ball is hit so slowly toward a Fielder that 
he cannot handle it in time to put out a man. 

(4) In the fourth column should be placed to 
the credit of each player the total bases run during 
the game. In scoring " bases run " where a player has 
reached first base as the result of the putting out of 
another player, such first base shall not be credited to 
the striker as one of the bases run by him. 

Fielding. 

(5) The number of opponents put out by each 
player shall be set down in the fifth column. Where 
a striker is given out by the Umpire for a foul strike, 
or because he struck out of his turn, the put-out shall 
be scored to the Catcher. 

(G) The number of times the player assists shall be 
set down in the sixth column. An assist should be 
given to each player who handles the ball in a run-out 
or other play of the kind. 

An assist should be given to the Pitcher when a 
Batsman fails to hit the ball on the third strike. 

An assist should be given to the Pitcher in each case 
where the Batsman is declared out for making a foul 
strike or striking out of turn. 
^An assist should be given to a player who makes a 



RPPP 



ilPPPP 



OF PROFESSIONAL BASK BALL CLUBS. 7? 

play in time to put a runner out, even if the player 
who should complete the play fails, through no fault 
of the player assisting. 

And generally an assist should be given to each 
player who handles the ball from the time it leaves the 
bat until it reaches the player who makes the put-out, 
or in case of a thrown ball, to each player who throws 
or handles it cleanly, and in such a way that a put-out 
results, or would result if no error were made by the 
receiver. 

(7) In the seventh column should be placed the 
" total chances offered " to retire players, which should 
include each perfect play, as well as each misplay or 
failure to accept a chance to retire a batsman or base 
runner. " Chances offered" should not include "passed 
balls," M called balls," or " wild pitches." In scoring 
" chances offered " off batted balls, see Sec, 3 of this 
Article. 

CLASS VII. 

CONSTRUCTION AND AMENDMENTS. 

Rule 61. No Section of these Rules shall be con- 
strued a3 conflicting with or affecting any article of 
the Constitution of the League. 

Rule 62. No Amendment or change of any 
of these Rules shall be made, except in the manner 
provided in the Constitution of the League* 



_ 



78 



SPECIAL MEETIHG8 






LEAGUE MEETINGS. 

Special Meeting of the Boaed of Dieectoes of 
the National League of Piiofessional Base 
Ball Gttras, held at Piebcb's Hotel, Buffalo, 
N. Y., Monday, Sept. 29, 1&1 9. 
Present, Mr. W. A. HutBBKT, Chairman, and 

Messes. J. F. Evans and Henry T Hoot, Directors. 

The following resolution was adoj. 
Whereas, Edward Nolan, whose expulsion by tho 
Indianapolis Base Ball Association, of Indianapolis, 
Ind., for violation of contract with said association, was 
approved by the Board of Directors of the National . 

igue by a resolution adopted, has made formal ap- 
plication to this Board for a rehearing in his case, and 
Whereat, it never appeared or was proven that the 
said Edward Nolan was guilty of throwing or selling 
games, or any dishonorable action of that nature, but . 
has, in those respects, sustained a good character and 
now sincere 1 }- repents of the conduct which resulted 
in his expulsion, therefore 

Resolved, That the said Edward Nolan shall bo 
eligible to play in or against any League or League 
Alliance Club on and after this date, Sept. 29, 1879. 
{Signed) W. A. HULBERT, 

Chairman- 



Henry T. Root, 
J. F. Evans, 



Directors. 



of the national league. i 'j 

Special Meeting oe the National League of 

Professional Base Ball Clubs, held at Pierce's 

Hotel, Buffalo, N. Y., Monday, Skit. 29, 1879. 

Present, W. A. Hulbert, representing the Chicago 
Ball Club. 

Jno. B. Sage, representing the Buffalo Association. 
^ Henry T. Root, representing the Providence Asso- 
ciation. 

J. F. Evans, representing the Cleveland Association. 

A. H. Soden, representing the Boston Association. 

Gardner Earl and C. R. DeFreest, representing the 
Troy City Association. 

Meeting called to order by the President at 10 a. m. 
* On motion the reading of the minutes of previous 
meetings were dispensed with. 

On motion the following resolutions were adopted, 
viz: 

^ 1. Resolved, That all players engaged in this asso- 
ciation during the season of 1880 shall be charged 
thirty dollars (830) each for the uniforms furnished 
them by their club, and that each player shall be re- 
quired to keep the same clean and in good repair; also, 
that while absent traveling during the season of 1880 
the sum of fifty cents per diem shall be deducted from 
each player's salary. 

2. Resolved, That in the event of the dissolution of 
the existing Cincinnati Base Ball Club, the annual 
meeting to occur in December, 1879, be held at Niag- 
ara Falls. 

3. Resolved, That the contract season for 1880 and 
subsequent years shall be for the term of seven months, 
beginning April 1, and ending Oct. 31 in each year. 

4. Resolved, That the Secretary of this Association 
be and he is hereby instructed to accept as valid two 
contracts entered into by the Cleveland Club, one by 
thy Chicago Club and two by the Troy Club, prior to 
this date, all wiih non-League players. 

5. Resolved, That all previous action relative to the 
date of the engagement of players for 1880, fixed at 






80 



SPECIAL JHEETIKGS 



the last meeting of this Association, be reconsidered, 

to take effect Oct. 1, 187'.'. . 

On motion adjourned to meet at o.uU i . m. 
Meeting called to order at 5:30 v. :,., ^proceeded 

to the consideration of the following *f ;eement, wh . 

was duly signed, after which adjourned to meet on tin 

following day. 

AGREEMENT AS TO CONTRACTS. 
The undersigned Associations, members of the Na- 
tional League" of Professional Base Ball Clubs. 

hereby ag^G each with the others that in contracting 
1 plafers for the season of 1880, and for subs,.,,,-,! 
vcars we will, in every instance, make use of the form 
o contract that is attached hereto, and now with this 
agreement, filed with theSecretary of the League M 
contract shall be made with any player except m the 
form now agreed upon, nor shall the torm be modified 
orTha^edln the Le of any player .or of any club. 
Each of the subscribing ' clubs pledges itself to * ote, 
at the next annual meeting * *• LjJG * »* ™£ 
an amendment to Section 1 of Article XF of the ton 
stitution of the League, which shall rendei that sec 
tion as so amended, conformable to this agreement. 
IUs further agreed that in all contracts to be made 
hJeafter with any player, the term of J^vxce to jj 
one year shall be for seven months, beginning April 

1S ind\n e ^?S;allw;iges be paid to any player on 
account of his contract before .ho same shall J^een 
earned bv him, except so far as money may be »< : eueu 
by him to pay his expenses from his home to join his 

"SS^ES?- to be made by each cluVwith 
each of its players, shall, after its execution bv 0m 
parties to it, be forwarded to the Secretary of the 

^Kthe Secretary shall find the contract to be in tbe 
p,, bribed form/he shall endorse upon it the date ol 



OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



81 



its reception by him, and shall enter the date of its 
receipt and the names of the parties to it in a book to 
be kept for that purpose. He shall then return the 
contract to the club from which he shall have received 
it. In no case shall the Secretary notify other League 
dubs of such contract as provided in Section 2 of Ar- 
ticle XI of the Constitution, or act upon the contract, 
until lie shall have found it to be in proper form as 
herein agreed. 

Dated' at Buffalo, N. Y., Sept. 29, 1879. (Signed) 

The Chicago Ball Club, 

• By W, A. Hulbert President.^ 
Tin-: Boston Bask Ball Association 

By A. II. Sorter President* 
Tin; Buffalo Base Ball Association, 

By J no. B. S<<f/e } President, 
The Cleveland Bask Ball Association, 

By J. F. Emm, President 
The Peovidence Base Ball Association, 

By //. "/'. Eoot : President 
The Troy City Base Ball Association", 

By Gardner Barl> President 
The Cincinnati Base Ball Association, 

By IF. A, Hulbert, Delegated, 
Dec. 4. 1879, 

The New Cincinnati Base Ball Association, 

By 0. P. Caylor, Delegate, 

Tlkm.av. Sect. SO, I 
Meeting called to order at 10 a. m. 
Mr. John B. Sage was duly elected a League Di- 
rector to fill vacancy caused by the resignation of Mr. 
Howard G-. White. 

No further business appearing, on motion adjourned. 
[Signed] W. A. HULBERT, 

President 
N. E. Young, Secretary. 



S3 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 



Meeting of the Board op Directors of the Na- 
tional League of Professional Base Ball Clubs 
geld at Pierce's Hotel, Buffalo, N. Y., Wed- 
nesday, Dec. 3, 1879. 

The meeting was called to order at 11 a. m. 
Present, Mr. W.A. Hulbert, Chairman, Messrs. Root, 
Evans and Sage, Directors. Mr. A. H. Soden, of Boston, 
was duly elected a Director to fill vacancy caused by 
the resignation of J. M. W. Neff. 

The Secretary presented a tabular statement of 
championship games won and lost during the season of 
1879 showino- the Providence Club to have won the 
greatest number. On motion the following resolution 
was adopted: B . 

Resolved, That the Providence Base Ball Association, 
of Providence, R. L, having won the greatest number 
of games in the Championship series is hereby award- 
ed the Championship of the United States for the year 

1880. . , , 

The report of the Treasurer was received and accept- 
ed. 

The application of the Cincinnati Base Ball As- 
sociation for League membership, was received and 
referred to Messrs. Root, Sage and Evans, who report 
favorably on their admission. 

The application of the National Base Ball Club, of 
Washington, D. C, was received and referred to Messrs. 
Soden, Evans and Root. 

On motion the following resolutions were adopted: 

(1 ) Resolmd) That the Syracuse Base Ball Associa- 
tion/of ,N. Y., has forfeited its membership 
in this League, m . . 

(2.) Resolved, That the resignation of the Cincin- 
nati Base Ball Association of date October 24, 1879, 
be placed on file. 

(3.) Resolved, That the game which should have 
been played between the Cincinnati and Chicago 
Clubs, in Cincinnati, Aug. 13, 1879, be declared forfeit- 



nm 



OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



83 



ed to the Chicago Club and counted as a game won by 
the said Chicago Club by a score of nine runs to none. 

The Secretary 'presented a communication from Mr. 
Alex. McKinnon, who asked for a removal of disabili- 
ties caused by his expulsion from the Troy City Base 
Ball Association. On motion the appeal of Mr. Mc- 
Kinnon was denied. 

Mr. W. II. Graver also made application for a re- 
moval of disabilities caused by his expulsion from the 
Louisville Base Ball Club. On motion the appeal of 
Mr. Graver was denied. 

Mr. N. E. Young was re-elected Secretary for the 
ensuing year. 

No further business appearing, on motion adjourned. 
(Signed,) W. A. HULBERT, 

Chairman* 

J. F. Evans, } 

Henry T. Root, f 

A. II. Soden, fWc&ors. 

Jno. B. Sage, J 




Annual Meeting of tiie National League op Pro- 
fessional Base Ball Clubs, held at Pierce's Ho- 
tel, Buffalo, N. Y., Wednesday Dec. 3, A. D. 
1879. 

Meeting called to order by the President at 12 M., 
and, on motion, adjourned to meet at 2 P. M. 

Meeting called to order by the President at 2 P. M. 

The following named gentlemen presented their cre- 
dentials as the representatives of their respective clubs: 

W. A. Hulburt and A. G. Spalding, representing the 
Chicago Ball Club. 

A. H. Soden and Harry Wright, representing the 
Boston B. B. Association. 

E. B. Smith and John B. Sage, representing the Buf- 
falo B. B. Association. 






84 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 



J. F. Evans, representing the Cleveland B. B. Club. 

H. T. Root, representing the Providence B. B. Asso- 
ciation. 

Gardner Earl and C. R. DeFreest, representing the 
Troy City B. B. Association. 

On motion the order of business was changed as 
follows: 

1. Reading minutes of last meeting. 

2. Report of Board of Directors. 

3. Election of New Members. 

4. Amendment of Constitution. 
3. Amendment of Playing Rules. 

5. Election of Officers. 

7. Miscellaneous Business. 

8. Adjournment. 

The minutes of the previous meeting were read, and, 
on motion, accepted. 

On motion, the report of the Board of Directors was 
received and adopted. 

The Cincinnati Base Ball Association was unani- 
mously elected a member of the League, and Messrs. 
Justus Thorner and O. P. Caylor were duly admitted 
as th.3 representatives of that organization. 

Tue meeting next proceeded to consider amendments 
to the Constitution, which, as amended, were adopted 
as follows: {See Constitution) 

The meeting next proceeded to consider amend- 
ments to the Playing Rules, pending the consideration 
of which, on motion adjourned to meet on the follow- 
ing day: 

Thursday, Dec. 4, A. D. 1879. 

Meeting called to order by the President at 10 A. M. 
and resumed the consideration of amendments to the 
Playing Rules, which, as amended, were adopted as 
follows: {See Flaying Rules.) 

Election of officers being the next business in order 
Mr. W. A. Hulbert was unanimously re-elected as 
President of the League. 

The following named gentlemen were selected, with 



OF THE NATIONAL LKAGUB. 



85 



the President, to constitute the Board of Directors for 
the ensuing year, namely: A. H. Soden, Jno. B. Sage, 
J, F.Evans, and Justus Thorner. 

The committee on the conditional application of the 
National B. B. Club of Washington, D. C, reported 
that they were not prepared to report upon the condi- 
tions contained in said application. 

On motion, the report of the committee was receiv- 
ed, and the committee discharged. 

On motion, the application of the National Club was 
laid on the table. 

On motion, the communications of the Albany and 
Worcester Clubs were placed on file. 

Mr. Smith offered the following resolution: 

Resolved, That each Club of this Associationbe per- 
mitted to have the exclusive right to regulate its own 
rate of admission to games played on its own grounds. 

Lost. 

Mr. De Freest offered the following resolution: 

Resolved, That it is the sense of this Association 
that the uniform price of admission to all League 
Championship contests be fixed at fifty cents; but it is 
hereby tacitly agreed and understood that such mem- 
bers as desire may sell commutation tickets upon such 
terms as may be agreeable to the members desiring to 
effect such sale. 

Resolved, That this resolution be entered upon the 
minutes but be not promulgated in the official publi- 
cation of the Association. 

Lost. 

Messrs. Hulbert and Soden were constituted a com- 
mittee to prepare a schedule for the season of 1880. 

On motion the publication of the League Book was 
left to the hands of the Secretary. 

On motion a committee was appointed to confer with 
manufacturers present in relation to furnishing balls. 
The committee reported in favor of the Spalding 
League Rail, and the Secretary was instructed to 
make contract with A. G. Spalding & Bros., of Chicago, 



80 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 



111., for furnishing the necessary number for the use of 
League clubs during the year 1880. 

On motion the application of the National Club was 
taken from the table. Owing to the conditions con- 
tamed in the said application being contrary to the 
League Constitution, the said National Club was gran- 
ted leave to withdraw the same. 

On motion the following resolution was adopted: 

Resolved^ That the League tender to Mr. A. G. 
Mills, of Chicago, Ills., a vote of thanks in recognition 
of his valuable assistance to the President of the 
League in the re-arrangement and improvement of the 
Playino* Rules as adopted by the League at this meet- 
ing. 

It was moved and seconded that the next annual 
meeting of the League be held in New York City, and 
that the selection of the hotel be left in the hands of 
the President. Carried. 

On motion, the President was empowered to recon- 
vene this meeting prior to April 1, 1880. 

On motion, the Secretary was instructed to pay to 
Mr. L. H. Malm, the defaulted bill of the Milwaukee 
B. B. Club, amounting to $15. 

On motion a vote of thanks was tendered to Mr. W. 
A. Hulbert for the able and impartial manner in which 
he has presided oyer the deliberations of the League. 

On motion, adjourned to meet at 10 A. M., on the 
following day. 

Friday, Dec. 5, 1879. 

Meeting called to order at 10 A. M. 

No further business appearing on motion adjourned. 

(Signed,) W. A. HULBERT, President. 

N. E. Young, Secretary. 



OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



SPECIAL LEAGUE MEETING. 

FEB. 28, 1880. 

Meeting of the Board of Directors of the Na- 
tional League of Professional B. B. Clubs held 
at theOsborn House, Rochester, N. Y., Feb. 26, 
1880, at 10:30 a. m. 

The Board of Directors, on the question of the in- 
terpretation of Section 2 Article 3, of the League Con- 
stitution, rules that the population within the territorial 
limits prescribed in Sec. 8, Art. 5, determine the eligi- 
bility of the applicant. 

On the declaration of Mr. Robert Ferguson, who 
appeared and presented credentials as a delegate from 
the Troy City B. B. Association, that he was not under 
contract or engagement with it as a ball player it 
was voted by the Board of Directors that he was eligi- 
ble to sit as a delegate from said Troy City B. B. As- 
sociation. On motion adjourned. 

(Signed) W. A. HULBERT, 

J. F. Evans, 1 , Chairman. 

A. H. SODEN, I Directors 

Justus Thorner, t directors. 

Jno. B. Sage, J 

Special Meeting of the National League of Pro- 
fessional B. B. Clubs held at the Osborn House, 
Rochester, N. Y. f Thursday, Feb. 26, 1880. 
Meeting called to order by President Hulbert at 
12 M. Present: 

W. A. Hulbert, 

Representing the Chicago Ball Club. 
Robt. Ferguson, 

Represent ing the Troy City B. B. Ass'n. 
Freeman Brown, 

Representing the Worcester B. B. Ass f n. 
A. H. Soden and Harry Wright, 

Representing the Boston B. B. Ass'n. 
Henry T. Root, 

Representing the Providence B. B. Ass'n. 



88 SPECIE MEETINGS 

Jno. B. Sage and E. B. Smith, 

Representing the Buffalo B. B. Ass*n. 

Justus Thorner and O. P. Caylor, 

Representing t?w Cincinnati B. B. Ass'iu 

J. F. Evans, 

Representing the Cleveland B. B- Ass f n. 

On motion of Mr. Smith, the following resolution 
was adopted : 

Resolved, That in view of the possibility of any 
club now a member of the League, forfeiting its mem- 
bership by disbandment, or inability from any cause 
to play out the games as per schedule, a committee 
consisting of Messrs. Hulbert and Evans are hereby 
appointed and fully empowered to arrange with any 
club in good standing to take the place so vacated by 
the retiring club under certain conditions and obliga- 
tions to be fixed by said committee; and Provided that 
such an arrangement does not confer membership on 
said club, so appointed, nor involve any change in the 
season schedule of games as fixed. 

On motion of Mr. Smith, the following resolution 
was adopted : 

Hesoived. That the Secretary of the League be and 
is hereby instructed to furnish each League olub with 
a book made up of blanks in duplicate, similar to an- 
nexed form, for the purpose of carrying out more 
effectually the provisions of the business agreement 
in force between the members of the Association rel- 
ative to statement to be forwarded to the proper officer 
of the visiting club, and that, at the conclusion of 
every game, said blank, properly filled, shall be for- 
warded to the President or Secretary of said visiting 
club. 

On motion, a recess of ninety minutes was taken. 

Meeting called to order at 3 P. M. Mr. E. B. 
Smith in the chair. 

On motion of Mr. Hulbert, it was voted that the 
chairman appoint a committee of two, who are author- 









m*m*mm 



SPECIAL MEETINGS. 89 

ized and empowered to enter into contract for not ess 
than 8,000 show bills to be used in advertising base 
ball games. The chairman appointed Messrs. Hulbert 
and Sage as such committee. 

On motion, a recess of one hour was taken. 

Meeting called to order at 7.30 P. M. by the Presi- 
dent. The following umpires were duly elected to 
complete the list for 1880, namely : Messrs. Scofield, 
Tilden, Murphy, Sullivan, Lynch, Libby, Wilbur, 
Waterman and Riley. (See complete list of League 
umpires for 1880.) 

A communication was received from Mr. P. I. Earle, 
Secretary Dubuque B. B. Club, inviting League clubs 
to visit their city and play the Dubuque club during 
the season of 1880. The Secretary was instructed to 
inform Mr. Earle that the League clubs would be 
pleased to avail themselves of their liberal offer when- 
ever it was possible or convenient to do so. 

Propositions from the proprietors of hotels in the 
di lie rent League cities, offering special rates, etc., 
wciv received and duly considered. 

On motion, adjourned to meet at 9 A. M. on the 
following day. 

ADDRESS TO PLAYERS. 

The following address to the base ball players of the 
League was presented by President Hulbert and 
unanimously adopted: 

1880. 

Mr 

The • ; • • • Base Bali Club 

of desires to bring to your 

notice, as a playing member under engagement to this 
Club, and to urge upon your careful and thoughtful at- 
tention, the following Address to this Players of 
League Clubs, drafted and formally adopted by the 
League, at a Special Meeting held in the City of 
Rochester, N. Y., on the JSth day of February, 1880: 



■ 



Ti 



90 



OF TEIE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



DISCIPLINE AND PENALTIES, 

In view of the various new and important features 
introduced into League legislation, touching the rela- 
tion of players to their clubs, it seems eminently wise 
and proper that a statement be made concerning the 
intention and effect of the alterations and amendments 
in question, in order that there shall be a distinct 
understanding as to the rights, responsibilities, and 
duties of both players and clubs. The purpose actu- 
ating the members of the League in thus drawing 
more tightly the reins of discipline has been simply 
and solely the carrying out, in letter and spirit, of that 
clause in the League Constitution wherein it is de- 
clared that the objects of the League are, among other 
things, "to protect and promote the mutual interests 
of professional base ball clubs and professional base 
ball players." That the amended code of the 
League for 1880 is directly in the line of this 
object, will indisputably appear after a careful 
survey of the situation in its altered aspects. The ef- 
fect of the new penalties and system of discipline, 
prescribed by the League, will be, primarily, to hold 
to a stricter accountability than heretofore that class 
of players who are in need of some powerful restrain- 
ing influence to help them guard against a tendency 
toward intemperance and excess. It is best to be 
plain and unequivocal in this matter, and to waste no 
words in coming to the point — which is, that hereafter 
it is not proposed to permit or tolerate drunkenness or 
bummerism in the playing members of League Clubs, 
It is not designed to interfere with the personal liberty 
of any player, by the imposition of foolish and im- 
practicable restrictions upon his conduct while off the 
ball field, further than to require that he shall not dis- 
grace his club and his avocation by scandalous and 
disreputable practices. A player's habits and deport- 
ment when not before the public in his professional 
capacity are matters which himself alone can regulate 
by the light of his interests and his conscience. Every 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 



01 



ball player is competent to see for himself that intem- 
perance is a two-edged sword in the hands of an adver- 
sary — cutting one way in the loss of the money he 
spends in the gratification of his appetite for liquor; 
cutting the other way in the loss of standing in his 
profession. Who does not know that the ball players 
in America receiving the highest compensation for 
their services are they who are scrupulously temperate 
and well-governed in their habits? There are players 
of the other class of a higher degree of skill, but who 
are handicapped in the matter of compensation and 
standing by a reputation for objectionable habits. The 
players receiving the highest salaries, by reason of their 
exemplary habits and consequent greater uniformity of 
skill and efficiency on the ball field, gain another ad- 
vantage, the great value of which it is not easy to 
estimate. This is in respect of their reputation and 
standing before the whole world of base ball patrons. 
A player's reputation is not confined to any one city; 
it is well known and correctly gauged all over the 
country; and sobriety and gentlemanly conduct make 
firm friends, who will some day be of value and bene- 
fit to a player after he has, voluntarily, or by reason of 
some disabling injury, retired permanently from base 
ball. Instances of the value and advantage to a player 
of friendship and good will thus acquired could be 
multiplied indefinitely. There can be no two opinions 
on the subject of the importance to players of gaining 
for themselves such a reputation as will not only yield 
them present profit, but will insure them the respect 
and good will of the great public by which the game 
of base ball is supported, and thus put them in the 
way of future benefits and advantages, which the bril- 
liant but unreliable player can never hope to realize. 
As before stated, the direction of the latest League 
legislation is toward stricter discipline and more effec- 
tual pains and penalties for misconduct. Beginning 
with Section 1 of Article V, of the League Constitu- 
tion, the power to suspend is additionally conferred upon 



n 



OF TUE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



each club, for any act or deed of omission or commission 
by which a player's services to his club are impaired in 
their efficiency and value. The player must render a 
full equivalent for his salary; he must live up to his 
contract, or suffer the consequences of an infraction of 
such contract. Each player should not fail to read 
carefully, again and' again, the language of his con- 
tract, which has been devised by the League to meet 
every known or imaginable exigency in the case, and 
the use of which contract is, by League law, made 
compulsory upon every club in the engagement of 
every player. The contract is printed in clear type, 
so that every player may read for himself, and under- 
stand fully, the obligation he is taking upon himself. 
The contract speaks for itself; its provisions are known 
to every player now under engagement in the clubs 
belonging to the League. It is with the new powers 
created for the enforcement of the contract that we now 
have to deal, and which we desire to bring to the notice 
of the players of the League, hoping thereby to bring 
about a fair understanding as to their rights and duties, 
and to secure their co-operation in the measures de- 
vised for the benefit alike of the honorable player, the 
honorable club management, and the honorable game 
of base ball. 

In Section 5, Article V, the words " or of any dis- 
honorable or disreputable conduct " no longer appear; 
this cause is no longer sufficient to warrant expulsion, 
but is provided for in an entirely new section (Sec. 0), 
by which a club is not only empowered to punish or 
discipline a player for so much as remains of the sea- 
son during which the offense was committed, but can 
go beyond that, beyond the life of its contract with 
that player, and suspend or disqualify him for the 
whole of the ensuing season, during which he is as 
absolutely shelved, disabled, annihilated, so far as 
playing in or against any League club is concerned, 
as though he had lost an arm or a leg. All this time 
he is not under salary, and is practically debarred from 



* 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 



93 



earning a living at base ball. The causes for which 
this penalty of suspension may be imposed are, 
"drunkenness^ insubordination, or any dishonorable or 
disreputable coiiduct;" and while the punishment may 
at first seem excessive, it will be recognized as a whole- 
some and reasonable restraint when its purpose and 
application are considered. Section G is designed to 
prevent that condition of demoralization into which 
players of the intemperate or insubordinate class re- 
lapse toward the close of the playing season, when 
their club has no longer any prospect of winning the 
championship, when their own bad conduct and bad 
play have rendered it certain that they will not be re- 
engaged in that club for the next year, and they have 
accordingly become reckless, defiant, and altogether 
unendurable to the club management. Very likely 
the player in question has overdrawn his salary, and 
for that reason is in different to the threat of suspen- 
sion for the rest of the season, for he has drawn nearly 
all the money coming to him anyhow, and suspension 
lias no terrors. But the extension of the penalty over 
into the next following playing season puts a different 
phase upon the case. He must render satisfactory ser- 
vice to his club during the whole time he is under con- 
tract, or, failing therein, he may be disqualified from 
play for the entire season succeeding. There need be 
no fear that a penalty so severe will be inflicted with- 
out just and ample cause. It is earnestly to be hoped 
it may never be inflicted, but its presence among the 
penalties authorized by the League Constitution can- 
not fail to prove a wholesome and beneficial restraint 
upon that class of ball players to meet whose case the . 
law was devised. 

Suitable provision has been made for the enforce- 
ment of all disciplinary or restrictive legislation, wheth- 
er relating to clubs or players. Section 7, Article 
V, of the Constitution, imposes the penalty of forfeit- 
ure of membership in the League upon any club tak- 
ing part in any game of ball on Sunday, or which shall 



94 



OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



fail to immediately expel any man under contract with 
it, who shall take part in any such game, either as 
player, umpire, or scorer; while in Section 10, Article 
V, every League club is prohibited from playing in 
its nine a player who has been expelled or suspended 
from the League, and the League clubs are moreover 
forbidden to play any club employing or presenting in 
its nine a player under the ban of expulsion or sus- 
pension. And it is important to notice that the dis- 
ciplining of a player for misconduct rests not alone 
with the club by which he is employed; on the con- 
trary, such player may be expelled by the Board of 
Directors of the League, upon the complaint of an- 
other club (Sec. 1, Art. VIII), for a repetition of 
misconduct, even though his own club should decline 
to prosecute and impose the penalty. Further than 
this, the terms of the League contract constitute in 
themselves a direct and effectual means of holding the 
player to the same degree of accountability for the 
satisfactory character of the service rendered that is 
exacted by every business man at the hands of the 
persons in his employ. To this end, it is expressly 
stipulated in the League contract that the player may 
be suspended from play, and from pay r at any time 
when he shall be deemed by the club management to 
be disqualified from playing with the requisite skill, by 
reason of illness, injury, insubordination, or misconduct 
of any kind; or, whenever he shall, by the Captain or 
Manager of the nine, be considered as lacking in the, 
zeal, willingness, or physical condition necessary to 
the rendering of satisfactory service as a ball player. 
As an inducement to every player to so regulate his 
habits and actions as to keep at all times in a sound 
and healthy condition, the League contract provides 
that there shall be no wages paid where no services 
are rendered; that for the period during which a player 
is suspended or excused from play, for any of the 
above mentioned reasons, he shall forfeitsuch a ratable 
proportion of his wages, for the season, as the number 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 






of games not played in by him bears to the total num- 
ber of games scheduled for the season. It cannot be 
denied that the placing of this power in the hands of 
club managers is a measure of necessary protection 
ainst habits of intemperance and their attendant 
evils oi unsound physical condition, moral reckless- 
ness, loose play, and general demoralization. Expe- 
rience has amply demonstrated the necessity for some 
plan 01 discipline that will reach the pocket as well as 
the pride of a player who deliberately and systematic- 
ally ialls short ol the honorable discharge of his obli- 
gations toward the club and the patrons of base ball. 
1 he compensation paid to players in League clubs is 
so. liberal as to entitle the clubs to the highest deoree 
oi .skill and the best service a player can render, °and 
it is the intention of the League to exact precisely 
this, and nothing less. There is not a condition or 
penalty prescribed in the League contract, constitution, 
or playing rules, that will work a hardship to any con- 
scientious, earnest, deserving player. It is only play- 
ers of . the opposite character who will suffer, and it is 
their turn to suffer. The clubs have had more than 
their share of the pecuniary loss, the aggravation, an- 
noyance and mortification caused by the state of affair*, 
which these conditions and penalties have been de- 
vtsed to correct, Justice to the players is a demand 
aim Obligation at all times ree '; justice to the 

club managers and stockholders, who hare made good 
thed nes iii the club treasuries, season after » 

to the public, upon who md 

patronage the clubs must depend for an ee; 

justice to the noble game of base ball, which it has 
1 the constant aim of the Lea : >vate, per- 

fect and popularize— these, ami these alone, are the 
cwisiderations which have influenced and brought 
about the League's latest legislation on the subject of 
discipline and penalties. 



J 



96 



OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



LEAGUE UMPIRES FOR 1880. 

The following named gentlemen were appointed 
official League Umpires for 1880: 

N( 1. B. F. Wade, No. 3 Case Building, Cleveland, O. 

2. Jos. W. Young, No. 10 Larned Block, Syracuse, 

N. Y. 

3. Wm. McLean, No. 713 N. 45th St., Philadelphia, 

Pa. 

4. A. G. Pratt, No. 120 Monterey St., Allegheny, 

Pa. 
^ 5. Chas. E. Davis, No. 17 Chestnut St., New Bedford, 

Mass. 
y( 6. W. E. Stearns, Interior Department, Washington, 

D. C. 
i 7. R. B. Finch, Ithaca, N. Y. 

8. Jas. L. White, Corning, N. Y. 

9. Jno. W. Schofield, Troy, N. Y. 

10. Geo. H. Bradley, No. 138 West Main St, Roch- 
ester, N. Y. 

11. S. W. Nickerson, care of Brown & Van Slyck, 
Providence, R. I. 

12. Chas. F. Daniels, No. 68 Sheldon St., Hartford, 
Conn. 

13. Michael Walsh, No. 3G5 7th St., Louisville, Ky. 

14. Al Barker, Rockford, 111. 

15. T. Gillian, London, Ontario* 

16. Otis Tilden, Brockton, Mass. 
* 17. Henry Murphy, Lynn, Mass. 
X IB. John T. Lynch, Holyoke, Mass. 
y 19. Stephen Libby, Chelsea, Mass. 

20. Dan'l F. Sullivan, No. 107 Siegel St, Chicago, 111. 

21. Chas. T.Wilbur, Troy, N. Y. 

22. W. E. Furlong, Milwaukee^Wis. 

23. Fred. "W nati, O- 

24. W. J. Riley, Cincinnati, O. 



X 

X 



SPECIAL MKKTINGS 



COPY OF AGREEMENT. 

Agreement in relation to engagement of players for 1881. 
The undersigned Associations, members of the 
National League of Professional B. B. Clubs, do 
hereby agree each with the others, that neither .they 
nor any officer, member or agent of their respective 
organizations shall contract with, employ, engage, or 
negotiate with any player for services during the 
season of 1881, or subsequent seasons, prior to Oct. 
23, 1880. 

In testimony whereof the parties hereto have here- 
unto set their names in the city of Rochester, this 
26th day of February, J 880. 
The Boston B. B. Association", 

By A. II. Soden, President. 
The Providence B. B. Association, 

By Henry T. Root, Presideni 
The Buffalo B. B. Club, 

By Jno. B. Sage, President. 
The Worcester B. B. Club, 

By Freeman Brown, Delegate. 
The Cincinnati B. B. Club, 

By Justus T homer, President. 
The Cleveland B. B. Association, 

By J. F. Evans, President, 
The CniCAGo Ball Club, 

By W. A. Hulbert, President. 
The Troy City B, B. Association, 

By Gardner Karl, President, 
Per Bolt Ferguson. 

Feb. 27, 1880.— Meeting called to order at 9.30 A. 
M. ^ The committee on schedule presented their report, 
which was adopted as follows, (See Schedule.) No 
further business appearing, on motion, adjourned. 
W. A. HULBERT, President. 

N. E. Young, Secretary. 



98 



SPE( AIL MEETINGS 



BUSINESS AGREEMENT 

FOR 1880. 

J. The parties hereto agree that during the ball- 
playi 30, in consideration of the advant- 

to each of a uniform business system, each club 
subscribing hereto shall pay to every other club sub- 
scribing hereto, for each championship game of ball in 
which such other club shall, as " visiting club," contest 
against it upon its own ground's, the sum of fifteen 
(15) cents for each and every person admitted to such 
grounds to witness such game, or any pari thereof, or 
admitted to such grounds for any other purpose, prior 
to such game or the hour appointed therefor, except- 
ing only players of the contesting clubs, policemen in 
uniform, and ten (UX) other persons. We further 
agree that, for the purposes of this agreement, it shall 
be sufficient for the visiting club to present its nine 
upon the grounds at the hour appointed, and p 

d to play the game in the absence of rain. 

2, Tire number of persons admitted to the grounds 
shall be determined by the use of the necessary num- 
ber of self-registering turnstiles, the keys of which 
shall 1 to the agent of the visiting club 
before the opening of the grounds for- each game, 
and such agent of the visiting club shall have the 

;i to affix a seal to j ler, or box, of such 

turnstile. 

3, We furtheragree that we will pay for the 
vices of the umpire five dollars per game, the visiting- 
club to pay such fee,,and also all expenses incurred in 
securing the attendance of such umpire. 

•1. We further agree not to play an; with 

any non-League club, upon the grounds of such uon- 



ME NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



99 



League club, except upon the following* stipulations, 
additional to those prescribed in Art. XII, Sec. 6, of 
the League Constitution : The non League club shall 
pay the League club, for each game actually 
played, ami immediately upon the termination of such 
game, one-half of the gross receipts of each game, or, 
the sum of one hundred dollars, as the League club 
may then prefer ; and the non-League club shall pay 
the League club fifty dollars in every case where a 
League club shall present its nine in the city or town 
of such non-League club, prepared to play at the 
time appointed for such game, and the game be pre- 
vented by rain, or any cause other than the refusal by 
such League club to play such game. In the event of 
the refusal or failure of any non-League club to pay 
the sum, or sums, due, as herein stipulated, the League 
club shall at once telegraph such fact to the Secretary 
of the League, who shall forthwith notify all other 
League clubs, by telegraph, and no League club shall 
thereafter play such defaulting club until the full 
amount due be paid the League club, which League 
club shall, in case of such payment, notify the Secre- 
tary, and he the other Leagae clubs, by telegraph. 

5. We further agree that, in any case not covered 
by Art. XII, Sec. G, of the League Constitution, a 
League club having agreed to play a non-League club 
upon the grounds of the latter, and failing to present 
its nine in the city or town of such non-League club, 
prepared to play at the time appointed for such game, 
the League club shall pay the non-League club the 
sum of fifty dollars as the penalty of such default. 

• ('». We further agree, each with the other, that at 
the conclusion of each League game we will cause an 
officer of our respective Associations to transmit to 
the proper officer of the club visiting club, at the place 
of its location, a statement of the receipts of said game. 



LOO 



MEETINGS 



In witness whereof the parties hereto have hereunto 
set their names at Buffalo, X. Y., this 4th day of De- 
cember, A. D. 1879. 

Tin-: Chicago Ball Cliu, 

By W. A. Etulberi, President 
The Providence Base Ball Association, 

By Henry T. Hoot, 2 
The Cleveland Base Hall Association, 

By J. F. Erjuts, President. 
The Cincinnati Stab Basic Ball ' Associatiok, 

By J o.siits Tltomer, Preside /if. 

The Boston Base Ball Association", 

By A. II. Sodcn, President. 
The Buffalo Bask Ball Association, 

By John B. Sage, t resident. 
The Troy City Base Ball Association, 

By Gardner Earl, President. 
The Worcester Base Ball Association, 

By Gliarles B. Pratt, President^ 

AGREEMENT IN RELATION TO SCHEDULE. 
It is hereby agreed and stipulated, by and between 
the Clubs, members of the National League, as wit- 
nessed by the sin-natures of their respective oilicers 
hereto subscribed, that the attached Schedule of 
Championship Games is adopted by them for the 
-on of 1880, to be binding upon each and all of 
them under the provisions of Sections B, 4, 5, 8 
and the 1th paragraph of Section of Article XII, of 
the Constitution of the National League, and that the 
Several series of ganv s bet ween the respective Clubs, 
as set forth in said Schedule, shall be played within 
the dates tin-rein specified {inclement weather, or un- 
avoidable accident in traveling-, or drawn or tie games 
excepted), it being understood that the particular day 
set for any game may be for good reasons changed by 
the mutual consent, in writing, of the two clubs to 
engage on that da y ; Provided^ the change be made 



^ 



OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



101 



to a day within the times specified for the particular 
series to which such game belongs. And the original 
copy of the said Schedule, bearing this endorsement, 
is to be filed with the Secretary of the National 
League, (who shall notify each League Club at once of 
such filing) and shall be made part of the records of 
the League, and this endorsement and filing shall be 
considered as a full compliance with the resolution in 
regard to Schedule of Games adopted at the meeting 
at Buffalo, N. Y., Dec. :j, A. D. 1870. 

Done at Rochester, N. Y., Feb. 27, A. D. 1880. 

The Chicago Ball Club, 

By W. A. Hulhcrt, President. 

The Cleveland Base Ball Club, 

By J. F. Evans , President. 
The Cincinnati Base Ball Association, 

By Justus Thorner, Preside jd. 
The Boston Base Ball Association, 

By A, II. 8oden 3 Preside/if. 
The Providence Base Ball Association, 

By Henry T. Boot, President. 
The Buffalo Base Ball Association, 

By John B. Sage i President. 

The Troy City Bask Ball Association, 

By Gardner Earl, President. 
Per BobL Ferguson. 

The Worcester Base Ball Association, 

By rn,n t <<,> Br>»rn, Delegate. 



102 OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 

SCHEDULE 0Y LEAGUE GAMES FOE 1880. 





^a 


« 




6 


a 




a 


s 






*j B 






** 


~ 




18S0. 


< ? 


<.s 


<; o 


<e 


<^ 


O 
P-i 


« 8 ■ < 2 




.d 






^ 




D3 


d^ 






Mav 1 


July 10 


May 25 May 29 


June 4 


June 16 J une 10 






"' 4 


" 13 


44 26 June 1 


" 5 


M 1? 


*' 12 






11 r, 


" 14 


" 27 


2 


* 8 


41 19 


11 14 


Chicago. 




Sept. 14 


Sept. 9 
* 10 


Sept. "4 


A ug. 3 
<r 5 


July 27 


July 21 


July 16 






" 15 


m *; 


** u*i 


* ' 23 


** 17 






44 1*, 


" 11 


" 7 


u 7 


u '■]■ 


M 24 


" 20 




May 7 




May 25 


July 10 


June 16 


June 10 


May 29 


June 4 




^ 8 




41 2<; 


" 13 


M 1? 


«• 12 


June 1 


L 


Cineia'ati 


« 11 

Sept. 18 




M 27 

Sept. 4 
" 6 


« 14 

Sept. 9 

tf 10 


" 19 

July 10 


* 14 

July 21 

" 2:5 


July 27 
4k 29 


" 8 

Ang. 3 
ir 5 




" 22 




14 (J- 


" 11 


** 20 


4t 24 


" 31 


« 7 




May IB 


May 13 




May 7 


Jane 4 


May 29 


June 10 


June 16 




"* 20 


" 14 




'• 8 


" 5 


June 1 


** 12 


M 1? 


Cletclautl 


" 2i 

Sept. 24 


M »15 

Sept. 28 
<* 29 




" 11 

Sept. 14 
" 15 


M 8 

July 27 
M 29 


" 2 

Ang. 3 

5 


July IIS 


" 19 

July 21 

" 23 




" 27 


" 30 




" 16 


" 31 


*. 7 


** 20 


« 24 




May 13 


May IB 


May 1 




June 10 


June 16 


June 4 


May 29 




M U 


" 20 


« 4 




** 12 


44 17 


** 5 


v - 31 


Buffalo. 


« 15 


" 23 


" 5 




k * 14 


«• 39 


«* 8 


June 2 


Sept. 28 
" 29 


Sept. 24 

" 25 


Sept. 18 

» 21 




July 21 
* 23 


July 16 


Aug. 3 
'^ 5 


July 27 
u 29 





•< 3*1 


M 27 


ii o j 




m 24 


" 20 


ii 7 


" 31 


July 1 


July 5 


June 26 


June 22 




May 1 


May 14 


May 24 




11 2 


6 


" 28 


" 2-3 




" 5 


July 10 


«' 25 


Boi ton. 

H 


" 3 


ii g 


" 29 


11 24 




»« 2<i 


" 14 


14 27 


Aug. 17 
" 19 


Aug. 10 


Ang. 31 

Sept. 1 

J 2 


Aug. U 
" 26 




Sept. 14 

* ie 


Sept. "'I 
•' 25 


S.'pt, 4 
8 


— 


M 21 


« 14 


" 28 




M 18 


1* 27 


'• 7 


July 5 


July 1 


June 2-2 


June 26 


May 4 
«' 18 




May 7 


July 10 




" 6 


M 2 


'* 23 


" 28 




.1 11 


" 13 


Pro'idnce 


" 8 
Aug. 10 


Ana. 17 

44 1!) 


" 21 

Aug. 24 
«P 26 


Aug. SI 


" 22 

Sept. 15 




" 26 

Sept. 2S 

" 29 


** 14 

Sept 9 




" 32 


Sept. 1 
d 2 


** 17 




tk 10 




" 14 


u 21 


" 23 


" 22 




•• 80 


" 11 




June 26 


June 22 


July 1 


July 5 


May 13 
»' 15 


May 8 




May 18 


' 


" 28 " 23 


a o 


" 6 


M 26 




*• 20 


Worcester 


Aug. 81 


« 3 
Ang. 10 


H 8 

Aug. 17 

tp 19 


July 13 
Sept. 9 


«. 27 

Sept. 4 

*' 6 




ta 22 

Sept. 14 
,f 15 




Jept, 1 

" 2SJ * 2 


« 12 


*« 10 




— 


" 14 


M 21 


" 11 


ii 7 




" 16 


June 22iJune 20 


July 5 


July 1 


May 7 


May 13 


May 1 






h 23 " 28 


6 


" 2 


44 8 


*. 14 


" 4 




boy City. 


M 24 " 29 


" 8 


" 3 


« 11 


" 15 


" 5 




Ang. 31 Ang. 24 
Sept. 1 ,r 26 


Aug. 17 
" 19 


Ang. 10 

» 12 


Sept. 28 
*f 29 


Sept. 24 
* 25 


Sept. 18 
" 21 




| 


* r 2 


« 28 


H 21 


M 14 


" 80 


M 27 


** 22 








ZOirtfi. 



ii -J ii mm 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL 



103 



BATTING AVERAGES 

Of players who have taken part in ten (10) or more Championship Games. 



SEASON OF 1879. 



Bfi 



NAilE. 



Armon 

Hi nee 

«>"i;<mrke,Jas 
j Kelly . ...... 



O'Kourko, Ju 
White, J. L.. 

well .. . 

Shaffer 

Start 

Jones 

Foley, C. J-. 

York 

Dalrvmnle.... 

) McVey 

"j Williamson.. 
j Dickerson — 
'( McGainsess . 

Fun-ell 

Flint 

Ward 

Kennedy 

Crowley 

I Wright 

1 Morrill 

j Kicluirdson.. 

i [Totaling 

i ry 

Brouthers 

( Clapp, Aaron 
i Eden 

Phillips 

........ 

Brown 

I Walker 

j Palmer 

f, 1.'»pp, J. E., 

Houck 

Ini 

Parcel] 

Barnes 

i Hall 

) Nelson 



CLUB. 



Chicago 

Providence .... 

Providence 

Cincinnati 

Providence , . . ,. 

Boston 

Cincinnati 

Boston 

I Jhicajro 

Providence ..... 


Boston .. 

Providence. 

Chicago 

Cincinnati 

Uhicasro..; 

Cincinnati 

Syracuse . 

Syracuse JbTrov, 

Chicago. 

Providence 

Cleveland .. 

Buffalo - 

Providence 

Boston 

Buffalo 

Cincinnati 

Providence 

Troy City. 

Troy City 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Chicago 

i & Prov. 

Syracuse 

Buffalo 

Buffalo...; 

Buffalo 

Buffalo.... 

Boston ; 

Troy City 

Syracuse <&> Cin. 

Cincinnati 

Troy City 

Troy City 



O 

49 
B4 
ft! 
76 
30 
70 

49 

70 
65 
83 

:)-> 
80 
67 
80 

80 
12 
65 

B2 
47 

59 
s-1 

M 

78 

BO 
si 
89 
M 
81 
hi 
m 
58 
59 
70 
T. r , 
Tfl 
87 
B0 
87 

71 

75 
M 
87 



< 



21 ii o, 
400 81 0. 

85 ( j m M 

804 5(2 
817701 
855 851 
147 18 

816 
351 
814 
847 
61 

810 

li»8 



to 

ii) 

44 

48 

19 

2 V, II 



i«8 17 
148 24 

365 



58 

0. 

:;n l, 



282 88 
319 460 

855 » 

■JX 81 

102 1610 



M .17 



V JO 
■A O 



.407 
.857 
.851 
.848 
.848 
.341 
.830 
.822 
.319 
.818 
.315 
.818 

.300 
.299 
299 
.594 
.294 
.298 

.2*7 
.' 

.283 
.281 

.281 

. 

.278 



.272 

.271 

.21 is 

.26 

.266 

.2«fl 

.286 

.264 

.255 

.255 



j a "•- « r 



.479 
.475 
.501 
.482 
.515 
.468 
. J 51 
.474 
.434 
.482 
.524 

.457 

.401 
.433 
.480 
.420 

.402 
.409 
.444 
.378 
.3% 
.441 
.4 If. 
.384 
.400 
.429 
.375 
.405 
.373 
.388 
.387 
.306 
.866 
.400 
.3-0 
.388 
.412 
.414 
.353 
.406 
.409 
.361 
.441 



104 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



Batting Averages — Continued. 



NAME. 



Peters 

Galviu 

Ferguson 

en 

Sutton 

Bradley 

Warner 

AlacselljThos 
Burdock 
Carey . . . 
Bond.... 
Snyder.. 
Kiley . . . 
Evans .. 
liague * 
M'Cormrk,H 
Doscher, 
j Larkin.. 
1 Burke... 
Quest... 
MeCormick,J 

j Taylor 

[ Creamer 

j Macullar 

j Foley, W. B. 
j Richmond ... 
) Mansell,M. 8 

J Force 

1 Glasscock ... 

Kggler 

Hawks 

Hnlhert 

Carpenter — 

( Mathews 

1 Ilawes 

Gerhardt 

Hankinson .. 
McGunigle . 

Strief 

GUIigan 

Allen 

Woodhead.. . . 

Mitchell 

Kiley 

White, W. H. 

Shouu 

Salisbury 



CLUB. 



Chicago .... 

Buffalo 

Troy City... 
Chicago .... 

Boston 

Troy City.. 
Cleveland ,\ 
Troy City..., 

Boston , 

Cleveland ... 
Boston •...., 

Boston 

Troy City..., 
Troy City... 
Providence . . 
Syracuse .... 
Troy City.., 

Chicago . 

Cincinnati . . 

Chicago 

Cleveland ... 
Truy City..., 

Syracuse 

Syracuse .... 
Cincinnati .. 

Syracuse 

Syracuse .... 

Buffalo 

Cleveland..., 

Buffalo 

Troy City.... 

Syracuse 

Syracuse 

Providence .. 

Boston 

Cincinnati... 

Chicago 

Buffalo 

Cleveland ... 
Cleveland... 
Syracuse A Cle'd 
Syracuse. ... 
Cleveland ... 
Cfeveland ... 
Cincinnati... 

Troy City 

Troy City.... 



79 
66 
29 
89 
84 
81 
76 
89 
HI 
BO 
66 
81 
61 
70 
50 
55 
46 
68 

27 

79 
76 
84 
15 
63 
55 
61 
66 
78 
80 

63 

58 
68 
42 
87 
78 
41 
46 
71 
52 
27 
88 
BO 
48 
75 
10 
10 



861 

2.7.) 

it'j 
141 
838 
244 
818 
178 
358 
885 
256 
328 
232 
273 
207 
227 
188 
225 
II 
31 
282 
Vi 
60 
244 

m 

251 

m 

311 
325 
312 
247 
226 
258 
170 
155 
■ 111 
158 
100 
864 
805 
109 
128 
109 
161 
292 

■11 

36 



8 " : 



0.51 
0.50 
0.02 
0.35 
0.6* 
0.54 
0.42 
0.74 
0.76 
0.37 
0.54 
52 
0.27 
0.40 
0.40 
0.38 
0.34 
0.46 
0.48 
0.45 
0.45 
0.41 
0.20 
0.38 
0.40 
0.50 
0.36 
0.46 
0.38 
0.52 
0.38 
0.19 
0.47 
0.59 
0.51 
0.28 
0.31 
0.47 
0.8! 
0.88 
0.55 
0.00 
0.36 
0.82 
0.3' 
u0.50 
810.80 






,254 

.254 

.252 
.248 
.248 
.245 
.243 
.24^ 
.240 
.238 
.238 
.234 
.232 
.230 
.227 
.224 
.223 
.222 
.222 
.220 
.219 
.216 
.216 
.213 
.213 
.211 
.211 
.209 



££ 



.2<;8 

.206 

.208 

.201 

.200 

.200 

.1*^9 

.188 

,180 

.174 

.170 

.165 

.164 

.146 

.142 

.137 

.097 10 

.0551 



121 
90 
52 
47 
124 
86 
122 
64 
130 
122 
95 
107 
79 
94 
67 
TO 
67 
HI 
40 
K>7 
87 
38 
is 
90 
69 
92 
B4 
99 
116 
109 
B9 
78 
96 
67 
52 
96 
45 
48 
§8 
65 
28 
86 
25 
40 



£*2 



fas 



.335 
,347 
.437 
.333 
.366 
.852 
.386 
.369 
.362 
.364 
.371 
.826 
.340 
.344 
.823 
.309 
.356 
.360 
.341 
.337 
.308 
.391 
.300 
.368 
.319 
.366 
.348 
.318 
.357 
.849 
.360 
,886 
.372 
.394 
.835 
.308 
.284 
.289 
.314 
.317 
,262 
.281 

.248 
.243 
.244 
.194 



6PAUHNGS OFFigiAL 



105 



SEASON OF 1879. 



Fielding averages of players who have taken part in ten or more Cham- 
pionship Games. 

FIRST BASEMEN. 



NAME. 



Anson ... 

Start ■ 

Morrill 

Co^gewell 

Kiley 

©organ.. 

Phillips , 

J as. O'Rourke.. 

IMcVey 

( Carpenter 

Walker 

Aaron Clapp.... 

McGninnese — 

Brouthers 

Hem sen 



CLUB. 



A p £ H (U U 



Chicago .... 
Pruvidence . 

Boston. 

Boston 

Troy City... 
Syracuse ... 
Cleveland... 
Providence . 
Cincinnati . 
Syracuse ... 

Buffalo 

Troy City... 
Syracuse .... 
Troy City... 
Chicago 



tn 










1 


d 


fcb 






3 







c 


p 


1: 

s 




3 






a 


o 




t. 
< 


it] 

M 




£ £' 


g 


C 




"5 













'A ' 


'A 


ir> 


* 


H 


49 


602 


8 


16 


626 


64 


?TH 


11 


22 


812 


33 


313 


16 


ll 


3-10 


49 


539 


10 


19 


568 


10 


109 


1 


4 


114 


21 


199 


6 


10 


217 


71 


719 


2t 


3f. 


I t i 


19 


2-.H) 


1 


11 


232 


70 


730 


3 


41 


774 


32 


293 


10 


IT 


320 


70 


811 


29 


18 


ass 


24 


ai;2 


4 


1!) 


285 


12 


us 


3 


g 


125 


37 


406 


6 


83 


445 


10 


125 


4 


ll 


140 



P. 

O w 

§ g 



974 
973 
967 
966 
965 
954 
.953 
.952 
.947 
.947 
.946 
.933 
.928 
.925 
.921 



SECOND BASEMEN. 



CJuesi 

Giaescock 
Burdock. ,, 
Fulmer ... 
Gerhardt.. 
Hawks .... 
McGeary . 
Farrell.... 
Barnes.... 

Strief 

Creamer... 



,... Chicago.. 

,. .. Cleveland 

.... Itotfion 

. .. Buffalo 

... Cincinnati 

... Troy City 

Providence 

.... Syracuse and Providence 

Cincinnati 

.... Cleveland 

.... Syracut-e 

THIRD BASEMEN 



?« 


tM6 


65 


201 


84 


303 


74 




56 


2«X) 


63 


214 


72 


214 


65 


202 


It 


47 


is 


35 


10 


Ml 



.926 
.919 
.910 
.908 
.895 
.894 
.883 
.878 
.857 
.835 
.825 



1 




Providence 


12 
15 
51 
68 
10 
77 
14 
83 


20 
38 
70 
79 
16 
82 
22 
86 


35 
30 
96 

187 
26 

148 
27 
43 


E 

7 
23 

39 

7 
42 

'J 
18 


60 

69 
189 
805 

49 
272 

58 


.916 


B 


Glasscock 

Morrill 




.898 


Boston 


.878 


4 

5 
6 


Williamson 

Ward 


Chicago 


B72 


Providence 


.857 


Richardson 


Buffalo • 


.845 


Cincinnati 


.844 


T 


\ Sutton.. 


Boston 


97 *44 



106 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 
THIRD BASEMEN. 

(CONTINUED.) 



NAME. 



Dorgan 

Warner 

Ha'jue 

Kelly 

Carpenter. . 
Ferguson . , 
Doscher — 
Wuodhead . 

Foley 

Allen 




Syracuse 

Cleveland 

Providence 

Cincinnati 

Syracuse 

Troy City 

Troy City 

Syracuse 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland and Syracuse. 



SHORT STOPS. 



a. 










0> 


•j 


tu 


X 




OS 


O 






00 


5 




SO 


ZL 


V 


'c 


3 


a. 


H 


c 






•^ 


-.t 


-c 


»*S 


o 






o 


r^ ? 




CO 






£* 


S 

a 


B 




o 


W M 


X. 


E-* 


X 




li 


14 


20 


7 


41 


54 


78 


109 


39 


226 


50 


53 


122 


38 


218 


34 


34 


91 


28 


153 


17 


33 


2ti 


u 


73 


24 


20 


55 


20 


104 


46 


47 


95 


■i'i 


177 


33 


52 


51 


27 


180 


26 


38 


44 


22 


104 


22 


44 


32 


22 


98 



829 
.827 
821 
817 
808 
B07 
802 
792 
788 
.775 



) 'Wright..... 
i Force 

Cnskins 

Sutton 

Richmond . 

Carey.. .... 

Barnes 

Peters 

Nelson .... 

j Houck 

| Macullar .. 
Burke 



Providence . 

Buffalo 

Troy City... 

Boston 

Syracuse 

Cleveland . . 
Cincinnati .. 

. go 

Troy City... 

Bo-ton 

Syracuse ... 
Cincinnati.. 



84 


96 


77 


70 


41 


42 


51 


53 


27 


51 


80 


79 


61 


95 


79 


9,' 


24 


33 


sa 


47 


35 


59 


19 


28 



.'•■ 

8824 

Bfc §8 

11236 

53122 



444 

856 

22* 
249 
186 

396 

3!";0 

145 
161 

207 
I 103 



.926 
.926 
.899 
.883 
.874 
.808 
.853 
.843 
.834 
.826 
.826 
.786 



FIELDERS. 



Jones 

Eggler 

McGunigle 

Uankinson 

Striefc 

York 

Macullar , 

Evans 

John O'Rourke.. 
M.K. Man sell... 

Kichraoud 

Remaen 

Gore 

Ilines 

Riley 

Jas. McCormick. 

Hornung 

Uall 



Boston 

Buffalo 

Buffalo 

Chicago 

Cleveland 

Providence... 

Syracuse 

Troy City.... 

Boston 

Syracuse .... 
Syracuse .... 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Providence .. 
Cleveland ... 
Cleveland ... 

Buffalo 

Troy City.... 



83 


162 


20 


18 


195 


77 


113 


11 


11 


135 


33 


60 


8 


6 


74 


12 


19 


1 


2 


22 


56 


105 


7 


L2 


124 


80 


114 


9 


14 


137 


24 


68 


6 


9 


83 


70 


148 


30 


28 


201 


70 


147 


10 


21 


178 


66 


202 


11 


29 


242 


33 


76 


7 


12 


95 


29 


50 


4 


8 


6v! 


52 


91 


9 


15 


115 


84 


145 


24 


26 


195 


43 


79 


12 


16 


107 


11 


20 


2 


4 


26 


77 


129 


12 


28 


167 


66 


125 


18 


27 


170 



.933 
.918 

.918 



,897 
.1B91 



.880 
-873 
.871 



850 
.846 

.844 
.841 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 
FIELDERS- Continued. 



107 



NAME. 



Warner 

Hotaiing 



Gillifffta 

Ilonck 

Eden 

Crowley 

j Dickerson 

i Shaffer 

( W. B. Foley 

1 Ja*. O'Hourke... 

Carpenter 

Kelly 

Taylor . . 

Mathews 

Parcel!... 

Dorgan 

Tho's. Mansell... 

Dairy in pie 

j Aaron Clnpp 

1 J. L. Whit* 

C. J. Foley 



CLUB. 



id..., 

Cincinnati 

B eton 

id 

Boston 

Cleveland 

Buffalo 

Cincinnati 

Chicago 

Cincinnati 

Providence , 



Cincinnati 

Troy City 

Providence 

* linctnnati and S\ . 



Troy < Ity .., 



Troy City 

Cincinnati 

Boston 



10,10 
6 8 

21 ' ' ' 

■ 
11 1! 
11 1 

7|H» 
2 1 • 

5] 7 
f » 1 1 
4 40 
Oil 



in 



mi 

.827 
,814 



B5 



70 .171 



I 
87 






CATCHERS' AVERAGES. 



NAME. 



Flint .. 

Snyder 

Kennedy. . . 
!», J. E 

Gross 

Holbcrt.... 

j Brown 

i White, J. E 

Kelly 

Crowley.... 

Gillian.... 

Gaskins.... 

Riley 



CLUB. 



Boston 

Providence 

Providence, 

Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati, 

Bufl'alo 

Cleveland., 

Troy City., 
Troy City., 






10 
If 
10 

37110 
6| 7 
41 
33J18 
49101 



"3^ 



1 

43»l.0tf 



108 



BASE BAXL GUIDE. 



o c_ ~* j*. » C — • 






5?gggaag2 



S 



o 

C9 



Number of Games 
Played. 



•— C* Tw — «***» v* - 



-* x cr. c, g 5 — -,t 

<y ~ > - 1 ±j en «^ .— tii 



i}t£_i 



^yw rx» 3* 31 -j 

00 -^ jg g °&N« 



Oi CJi ©J Ofc -1 00 $fi 2 

cc -1 cr. ■pgoOC'-* 



Nnmb'r of Games Won 



Times at Bat. 



Runs Scored. 



Average per Game. 



First Bases. 






'tage of Base 
Hits per times at 
Bat. 



> •— ft «© <,» V — S3 

OS ** cr. -J ** -* Civ 



Number of Timet 
Reached 1st Base 



w tf ce M M * ^ 



^ v i T' 



Pi* rentage of Times 
Reach' d 1st base, 
per Times at Bat, 



**, .-• fQ r. ■ iz, ji ri/c 
c * c f ; >-• '•— '— * i oe 



f * •£ a l- «2 2 ir 5 



£. A. >U f-. Cf 6S CO 65 
C. 5"' t? fc Oi g -1 QC 



— .U QC -1 '.S- - } — <i 

o< ■■=, ;/> x-)-i t^c 



•U pO *» i- : 



at QD cr 7 a 

8*863 



Number Put t. 



Times Assisted. 



Fielding Errors. 



Passed Balls and 
Wild Pilches. 



Total Chances. 



Percentage of 
Chances Accepted. 



a 



H 






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SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



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110 



BASE BAXL QUIDS. 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES PLAYED 

DURINO THE 

SEASON OF 1879. 



■I. 












Runs 


3 ^ 


Date, 

lira. 


Names or Contestants. 


WnERK 

Plaited. 


Winning 
Club. 


Scored. 




to 




°5 












'59 


•z =) 














.55 


33 


1 


May 


1 


Chicago vb. Syracuse 


Chicago — 


jo . . . 


4 


3 


2 


** 


1 


Boston vs. Buffalo 


Buffulo .... 


□ 


5 





3 


(i 


1 


Cincinnati vs. Troy City. 


Cincinnati. 


Cincinnati, 


7 


5 


4 


»* 


1 


Cleveland vs. Providence 


Cleveland . 


Providence 


15 


4 


5 


tt 


2 


Cleveland vs. Providence 


Cleveland.. 


Providence 


7 


6 


6 


M 


2 


Boston vs. Buffalo 


Buffalo 


Boston 


7 


4 


7 


14 


2 


Chicago vs. .Syracuse 


ChiC:<" 


igo.... 


10 


5 


8 


ft 


2 


Cincinnati vs. Troy City. 


Cincinnati. 


Cincinnati. 


10 


1 


9 


U 


3 


Cincinnati vs. Troy City. 


« Cincinnati. 


» Cincinnati. 


13 


12 


10 


I( 


S 


. vs. Buffalo 


Buffalo .... 


Buffah 


6 


4 


11 


M 


8 


Cleveland vs. Providence 


CI \i;iand.. 


Cleveland.. 


4 





12 


M 


5 


o 78. Svracu 




LgQ 


7 


3 


13 


It 


6 


, vs. Troy City.... 


JO.... 

Cleveland.. 


Chicago.... 


12 


1 


14 


(1 


9 


loo 


Boston 


7 


2 


15 


M 


6 


uvideuce — 


Buffalo 


Buff i 


8 


5 


16 


I* 


6 


Cincinnati vs. Syracuse.. 


tinati. 


Innati. 


7 


6 


IT 


tt 


8 


Cincinnati vs. Syracuse*. 


tnnatl 


Cincinnati, 


5 


2 


18 


tt 


8 


i vs. Provide 


Buffalo 





3 


2 


19 


It 


B 


Cleveland vs. Boston 


land.. 


D 


3 


1 


20 


ft 


6 


Chicago vs. Troy City 


1 . 


igo,... 


10 


6 


21 


tt 


10 Chicago vs. Troy City.... 




:0 


15 


8 


22 


M 


iOCincinn :use.. 


Cincinnati. 




7 


6 


23 


tt 


10| Buffalo vs. Providence.... 


Buffalo 




16 


10 


2-1 


it 


10i Cleveland vs. liofton 


tland.. 




7 


3 


25 


M 


13 Cleveland vs, Syracuse... 


Cleveland.. 


■ 


12 


8 


26 


M 




Ity..... 


Buffalo 


Buffalo 


7 


1 


27 


tt 


US 


." vs Providence.. 


jo 


Pun 


14 


5 


28 


ft 


i;j 


Ciuci nati vs. Boston — 


Cincinnati. 


; 


S 


2 


20 


(t 


lfi 


Cincinnati vs. Boston — ., 


Cincinnati. 


•i 


18 


2 


30 


M 


15 


V8. Pi'"' : 


:o 


Chlcag 


7 


2 


31 


II 


16 




Buffalo 


Troy. 


1 





32 


tt 


17 


vs. Troy City 


Buff-. 




16 


9 


33 


M 


17 


Cincinnati vs. Bo* 


Cincinnati. 


J at!. 


7 


4 


34 


tt 


17 


Chicago vs. P 






3 


1 


85 


It 


17 


Syracu- Land... 


; md.. 




11 


8 


36 


l« 


80 


Syracuse vs. Buffalo 

Chicago vs. Boston 

Cleveland ys. Troy City.. 







8 





37 


II 


80 


ago 


Troy Citf.. 


9 


6 


83 


(t 


80 


ind.. 


5 


8 


39 


il 


BO 


Cincinnati vs. Proi 


i.fjatl. 


Providence 


11 


5 


40 


It 


22 


Cincinnati vs. Providence 


tnnati 


Providence 


10 


9 


41 


it 


22 


Cleveland vs. Troy City.. 


Cleveland.. 


Cleveland.. 


10 


8 


42 


tt 


22 


Syracuse vs. Buffalo 

Chicago vs. Boston 





Syracuse... 


15 


11 


43 


If 


pa 


Chicago.. 


KO, . . • 


1 


8 



spalding's official m 

Record of Championshd? Games — Continued. 



■t 
9 












liUNS 


%-i 


Date, 

1879. 


Names ot Contestants. 


WUERB 

Played. 


WrNNTNO 

Club. 


Scored. 




to 


fcO ■ 


o 

to 












g 6 


3 b 


44 


May 


24 


Chicago ts, Boston 


Chicago.... 


Chicago ... 


fi 


3 


45 


*' 


34 


Cincinnati vs. Providence 


Cincinnati. 


Providence 


17 


1 


4« 


** 


34 


Cleveland vs. Troy City.. 


Cleveland.. 


Troy City.. 


7 


3 


47 


it 


34 


Buffalo vs. Syracuse 


Buffalo 


Syracuse... 


R 


8 


JS 




aa 


Balfalo vs. Providence... 


Providence 


Providence 


9 


3 


49 




& 


Chicago vs. Boston 


Boston 


Chicago 


6 





50 


4* 


38 


Cincinnati yb. Troy City. 


Troy. 


Troy City., 


20 


A 


51 


** 


38 


Cleveland vs. Syracuse.. 


Syracuse... 


Syracuse. . . 
Cleveland. 


4 





52 


** 


39 


Cleveland vs. Syracuse... 


Syracuse... 


14 


A 


53 




so 


Cleveland vs. Syracuse.. . 


Syracuse. . . 
Boston.... 


Syracuse... 


4 


3 


54 




80 


Chicago vs. Boston. 


Chicago. . . . 


R 





55 


(1 


BO 


Cincinnati vs. Troy City. 


Troy.. 


Cincinnati. 


4 


3 


56 




ao 


Buffalo vs. Providence... 


Providence 


Providence 


4 





57 




SI 


Buffalo vs. Providence. . . . 


Providence 


Providence 


1ft 


2 


58 




:il 


Cincinnati vs. Troy City. 


Troy 


Cincinnati. 


6 


fl 


59 


" 


ill 


Chicago vs. Boston 


Boston..... 


Chicago 


4 


3 


60 


** 


ai 


Cleveland vs. Syracuse. . . 
Cincinnati vs. Syracuse.. 


Syracuse... 


Syracuse. . . 
Cincinnati. 


R 


7 


61 


JUJDfi 


4 


Syracuse. . . 


6 


5 


62 


H 


5 


Cincinnati vs. Syracuse.. 


Syracuse. . . 


Syracuse... 


TO 


1 


6* 




5 


Chicago vs. Providence.. 


Pro vi deuce 


Chicago.,.. 


6 


5 


64 


H 


5 


Cleveland vs. Troy City.. 


Troy 


Cleveland.. 


4 


3 


65 


t* 


G 


Boston vs. Buffalo 


Boston 


Boston 


7 


4 


M 


H 


6 


Providence vs. Chicago.. 


Providence 


Providence 


8 





67 


>( 


7 


Providence vs. Chicago.. 


Providence 


Chicago.... 


13 


A 


68 


*• 


7 


Cleveland vs. Troy City.. 


Troy 


Troy City.. 


19 


4 


69 




i 


Cincinnati vs. Syracuse.. 


Syracuse... 


Syracuse... 


9 


8 


70 


(v 


7 


Huston vs. Buffalo 


Boston 


Buffalo 


4 


1 


71 


14 





Boston vs. Buffalo 


Boston 


Boston 


9 





73 


1* 


10 


Boston vs. Cleveland 


Boston 


Boston 


11 


1 


73 


14 


10 


Providence vs. Cincinnati 


Providence 


Providence 


6 


1 


74 


If 


1] 


Chicago vs. Troy City 


Troy 


Chicago.,.. 


a 


8 


76 




11 


Syracuse vs. Buffalo 


Syracuse... 


Syracuse... 


7 


5 


Vfl 




n 


Syracuse vs. Buffalo 

Chicago vs. Troy Citv 


Syracuse... 


Buffaio..... 


5 


8 


77 


I* 


la 


Troy 


.... 


18 


8 


78 




hi 


Boiton vs. Cleveland 


Boston 


Boston 


1 





79 


II 


13 


Providence vs. Cincinnati 


Providence 


Providence 


19 


A 


60 


11 


li 


Providence vs. Cincinnati 


Providence 


Providence 


4 


8 


81 


it. 


l-l 


Cleveland vs. Boston 


•a... , 


land.. 


8 


?, 


82 


M 


u 


Syracuse vs. Buffalo 

Chicago vs. Troy City 


Syracuse.. 


Buffalo 


10 





8S 


II 


n 


Troy 


Troy 


10 


9 


84 




l, 


Chicago vs. Syraci 


Syracuse... 


IgO.... 


8 


3 


85 


i» 


w 


Buffalo vs. Troy City 


Troy 


Buffalo 


8 


1 


m 


K 


r. 


Boston vs. Cincinnati.... 




Boston 


9 


A 


87 


M 


17 


Cleveland vs. Providence 


Providence 


Cleveland 


5 


9! 


88 




19 


Cleveland vs. Providence 


Providence 


Providence 


8 


1 


89 


*k 


19 


;o vs. Syraci 


Syracuse... 


JO 


4 


8 


90 




19 


B u fl'al o vs. Troy Citv 


Troy 


Buffalo 


4 


8 


91 




19 


Boston vs. Cincinnati 


Boston..... 


Boston..... 


A 





83 


(i 


20 


Buffalo vs. Troy City 


Troy., 


Buffalo 


8 


8 


u 




■z\ 


Chicago vs. Byrac 


Syracuse... 


Chicago.... 
Providence 


If 


3 


it 


U 


21 


Cleveland vs. Providence 


Providence 


5 


3 



112 BASK BALL GUIDE. 

Reoobd ov Championship Games — Continued. 



fl . 






«-o 






of 


Date, 




1879. 


o 






& 






95 


Jane 


21 


96 


tt 


28 


97 


it 


24 


98 


u 


2} 


99 


II 


34 


100 


*' 


25 


101 


M 


26 


103 


it 


2;> 


103 




25 


104 




26 


105 


** 


20 


lOti 


" 


2, 


107 


" 


27 


108 


(I 


2b 


HH* 


11 


^ 


110 




SO 


111 


* l 


30 


112 


July 


1 


113 


" 


J 


114 


«« 


1 


115 


ti 


1 


ll« 


tt 


a 


117 




a 


IIS 


«t 


2 


119 




4 


120 


t< 


1 


1*1 




1 


122 


tt 


4 


123 




5 


124 


tt 


5 


125 




5 


12£ 


tt 


b 


1*27 


, 


128 




B 


139 




8 


130 


<t 


H 


181 


tt 


10 


183 


M 


10 


133 


«« 


11 


1»4 


<( 


11 


OS 


tt 


12 


188 


tt 


12 


137 


tt 


12 


138- 


ft 


12 


139 


tt 


12 


140 


tt 


14 


141 


M 


14 


142 


<f 


U5 


148 


If 


15 


144 


ft 


lfi 


145 


tt 


15 



NAxze or Contestants 



Cincinnati vs. Boston... Boston 

Syracuse vs. Troy City.. . Troy 

Buffalo vs. Cleveland Buffalo 

Cincinnati vs. Chicago.. Cincinnati. 

Providence vs. Boston... Boston 

Pro via en ce vs. Boston... Providence 

Buffalo vs. Cleveland Buffalo 

Cincinnati vs. Chicago... Cincinnati. 

Syracuse vs. Troy City.. Troy. 

Syracuse vb. Troy Ci ty . . . Troy 

Providence vs. Boston... Boston 

Providence vs. Boston... lv>. 

Buffalo vs. Cleveland Buffalo 

Chicago y ». Cincinnati.. Chicago 

■nee vs. Boston . . . Boston 

Syrac use vb . Troy C Uy . . M y ra< 
Cleveland vs. Buffalo.... Cleveland.. 
Prpvidence vs. Boston... Providence 

Cleveland vs. Buffalo Cleveland.. 

Chicago vs. Cincinnati... Chicago.... 
Syracuse vs. Troy City . . . Syracuse. . . 
Syracuse vs. Troy City. . . Sym 
Cnicago vs. Cincinnati.. Cmc 

Cleveland vs. Buffalo Cleveland.. 

Cleveland vs. Bulhilu Buffalo 

Providence vs. Troy City Providence. 

Chicago vs. Boston Chicago.... 

Cincinnati vs. Syracuse. Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati vs. Syracuse. Cincinnati.. 

Chicago vs. Boston Chicago 

Buflalovs. Cleveland — Buffalo 

Providence vs. Troy City Providence. 
Providence vs. Troy City Providence. 

Chioago vs. Boston Chicago 

Cincinnati vs. Syracuse. . Cincinnati.. 

Buffalo vs. Cleveland Buffalo 

Cleveland vs. Providence Cleveland. . 

Chicago vs. Syracuse. ... Chicago 

Chicago vs. Syracuse.... Chicago.... 
Cincinnati vs. Boston..,. Cincinnati,. 
Cincinnati vs. Boston — Cincinnati. 
Chicago vs. Syracuse — Chi' 
Cleveland vs. Providence Cleveland. . 

Buffalo vs. Troy City Buffalo. 

Buffalo vs. Troy Citv.... Buffalo 

Cleveland vs. Providence Cleveland.. 
Cincinnati vs. Boston... Cincinnati, 
Cincinnati vs. Providence Cincinnati. 
Chicago vs. Troy City... Chicago.... 
Syracuse vs. Cleveland.. Cleveland.. 
Baffalo vs. Boston Buffalo 



Where 
Played. 



Runs 
Scored. 



Winning 
Club. 



■sx» 

a o 

I 5 



Clcinnati .. 
Troy City.. 
Cleveland.. 
Cincinnati. 
Providence 
Providence 

Buffalo 

Chicago.... 

Troy.. 

Troy 

in 

Providence 

Buffalo 

Chicago.... 

Boston 

Troy City .. 
Cleveland.. 
iTovidence 

Buffalo 

Cincinnati. 
Syracuse... 
Syracuse... 
Cincinnati. 

Buffalo 

Cleveland.. 
Providence. 

Boston 

Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 

Chicago 

Buffalo 

Providence. 
TToy City.. 
Chicago.... 
Syracuse... 

Buffalo 

Providence 
Chicago — 
Chicago.... 
Boston..... 
Cincinnati. 
Svracuse. .. 
Providence 

Buffalo 

Buffalo 

Cleveland.. 

Boston.. 

Cincinnati. 

Chicago.. . 

Cleveland.. 

Boston.. 



3° 



13 


a 

i 
i 

2 

8 
1 
1 
2 
8 
I 
1 
5 
2 
1 
4 

5 
5 

8 
2 
8 
4 
3 
1 

6 
6 
2 
7 
3 

1 
2 
f 

2 
2 
3 
7 
2 
3 
4 
5 
4 


7 
3 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL 1];} 

Record of Championship Games— Continued. 



u 



Date, 



N amiss op Contestants 



Where 
Played. 



Winntnq 
Club. 





as 



KtTNS 

Scored. 



to . 

•a » 



9 

(J 
S 
l 

4 

4 
5 
8 
6 
l 
I 



h 

4 
1 

4 
8 
8 
8 




2 

5 

1 
4 
8 
5 
6 

3 
8 
8 
2 

4 

5 




2 

1 

a 

o 
i 
l 

2 

H 
3 



146 
147 
148 
149 
150 
151 
152 
153 
151 
155 
156 
157 
158 
158 
160 
161 
162 
163 
164 
L60 
166 
167 
168 

170 
171 

172 

17a 

174 

175 
176 
177 
178 
179 
180 

18] 

183 

186 

1WJ 
189 
180 
191 
192 
193 
104 
195 
196 



July 


16 


** 


16 


it 


16 


** 


16 


u 


11 


u 


17 


it 


17 


ft 


17 


fi 


19 


If 


19 


(( 


1! 


ft 


IS 


u 


SI 


M 








t( 


21 










•t 


28 


.( 


23 


(f 


24 


ft 


24 


« 


25 


it 


26 


u 


26 


(1 


26 


II 


28 


M 


28 


If 


28 


II 


28 


(I 


29 


If 


80 


It 


80 


ft 


80 


l( 


8U 


II 


81 


If 


81 


ft 


81 


if 


81 


Augu 




it 








ft 


8 


tt 


B 


it 


', 


ti 


6 


fi 


6 


it 


6 


M 


6 



Buffalo vs. Boston Buffalo 

Chicago vs. Troy City... Chi. 
Cincinnati vs.ProvidencQ Cincinnati, 
Cleveland vs. Syracuse. Cleveland.. 
Cleveland vs. Syracuse.. Cleveland*. 

Chicago vs. Troy City.. . Chicago 

Cincinnati vs.Providenc 

Buffalo ve. Jioston Buffalo..... 

Buffalo vs. Syracuse Buffalo. . .-. . 

Olnctnnatj vs. Troy City CincinnatL 
Chicago vs. Providence.. Chic 

Jioston vs. Cleveland Cleveland,. 

Boston VS. Cleveland Cleveland. . 

Cincinnati vs. Troy City. Cincinnati. 

Buffalo vs. Syracuse Buffalo 

Chicago vs. Providence*. Chicago.... 
Chicago ve. Providence.. Chicago..,. 
Boston vs. Cleveland. .. Cleveland.* 
Troy City vs. Cleveland. Cleveland.. 

Buffalo vs. Providence. . . Buffalo 

Chicago vs. Cincinnati*.. Chicago.... 
Chicago VS. Cincinnati.. Chi< 

Buff'alo vs. Providence.. 1 Buffalo 

Syracuse vs. Boston Syracuse... 

Syracuse vs. Boston,.... Syracuse... 
Chicago vs. Cincinnati.. Chicago — 

Providence vs. Buffalo... Buffalo 

Cleveland vs. Troy City.. Cleveland.. 

Syracuse vs. Boston Syr 

Syracuse vs. Providence. Syracuse... 

Buffalo vs. Cincinnati Cincinnati. 

Chicago vs. Cleveland... Chicago — 

Troy City vs. Boston Troy 

Troy City vs. Boston Troy. 

Chicago vs. Cleveland... Chicago 

Buffalo vs. Cincinnati Cincinnati. 

Providence vs. Syracuse. Syracuse... 
Providence vs. Syracuse. Syracuse... 
Buffalo vs. Cincinnati... Cincinnati. 
Chicago vs. Cleveland... Chicago.... 

Troy City vs. Boston Troy 

Troy City vs. Providence Troy 

Boston VS. Syracuse Syracuse... 

Buffalo vs. Chicago. Chi 

Buffalo vs. Chicago Chlci 

Syracuse vs. Boston Syracuse.. 

Providence vs. Troy City Troy 

Providence ?S. Troy City Troy 

Chicago vs. Buffalo Chicago..., 

Syracuse vs. Boston . . Syracuse. . . 

Syracuse vs. Providence. Syracuse.. , 



Boston 

Chicago — 
' I'ovidence 
Cleveland.. 
Syracuse... 

i Inlcago 

nnatl. 
Boston 

Buffalo 

Cincinnati. 

Providence. 
Cleveland.. 

:i 

Cincinnati. 

Buffalo 

Chicago.... 
Providence. 

Boston 

rrov City. . 

Buffalo 

nnati 
Buffalo 

ease*.. 

Boston 

Cincinnati. 

Buffalo 

Cleveland.. 

Boston 

Providence 

Buffalo 

Chicago.... 

m 

Boston 

ago — 

Buffalo 

Providence 
Providence 

Buffalo 

Chicago 

Jioston 

Providence 
Boston 

Buffalo 

Buffalo 

; 

Provi; 

Providence 

Chicaj 

Providence. 



114 



BASE BAIX GUIDK 



Kecorb op Championship Games— Continued, 



fl * 






s*« 






o£ 


DATS, 


^* 


1879. 


o^ 






o 






% 






\m 


August 9 


19a 


*r 


9 


199 


it 


9 


200 


M 


11 


201 


CI 


11 


802 


It 


11 


203 


«t 


11 


804 


M 


12 


205 


U 


12 


206 


(i 


12 


207 


M 


ia 


208 


H 


18 


209 


ff 


14 


210 


II 


14 


211 


ft 


14 


212 


ft 


15 


213 




15 


214 


ft 


15 


215 


M 


15 


216 




18 


217 




19 


218 




19 


219 




19 


220 




19 


221 




20 


222 




2H 


2-3 




20 


224 


ft 


20 


225 


ft 


21 


226 


K 


21 


227 


ft 


21 


228 


tf 


21 


229 


ft 


22 


230 


ff 


22 


23] 


l< 


23 


238 


u 


29 


238 


<( 


28 


234 


ft 


23 


2% 


« 


25 


23P, 


tf 


26 


237 


ft 


2.; 


23S 


ff 


2*5 


239 


t* 


26 


240 


ff 


27 


241 


ft 


27 


242 


ft 


28 


243 


ff 


28 


244 


ff 


28 


245 


l< 


28 


M* 


ft 


29 


•47 


ft 


29 



Names oj» Contestants. 



Where 
Played. 



Winning 

Club. 



53, 



llUNS 
S CO RED 



Cleveland vs. Buffalo 

Boston vs. Troy City — 
Cincinnati vs. Chicago. 
Cincinnati vs. Chicago . . 
Buffalo vs. Cleveland... 
Syracuse vs. Providence. 
Troy City vs. Boston. . 
Troy City vs. Boston, . 
Buffalo vs. Cleveland.. 
Providence vs. Syracuse 
Chicago vs. Cincinnati... 
Providence vs. Troy City 
Providence vs. Troy City 
Syracuse vs. Boston — 
Chicago vs. Cleveland. . 
Chicago vs. Cleveland. . 

Boston vs. Syracuse 

Troy City vs. Providence 
Buffalo vs. Cincinnati. 
Cleveland vs. Chicago... 

Boston vs. Troy City 

Providence vs. Syracuse . 
Cincinnati vs. Cleveland 

Chicago vs Buffalo 

Chicago vs. Buffalo 

Providence vs. Syracuse. 
Cincinnati vs. Cleveland. 

Boston vs. Troy City 

Boston vs. Troy City 

Chicago vs. Buffalo 

Providence vs. Syracuse. 
Cincinnati vs. Cleveland. 
Cincinnati v.h. Cleveland 

Boston vs. Syracuse 

ttff, Syracuse 

Providence vs. Troy City 
Chicago vs. Cleveland... 
Clev< Land... 
•nee vs. Troy City 
Providence vs. Troy City 
Cbicagovs. Cleveland... 

Boston vs. Syracuse 

Cincinnati vs. Buffalo — 
Cincinnati vs. Buffalo... 

I vs. Syracuse 

Buffalo vs. Chi-, ago.... .. 

Providence vs. Syracuse. 
Cleveland vs. Cincinnati 
Boston vs. Trov City — 
Cleveland vs. Cincinnati. 
Boston vs. Troy CI ty 



Cleveland. 

Troy 

Cincinnati 
Cincinnati. 
Cleveland 
Syracuse,.. 

Troy 

Troy , 

Cleveland. 
Syracuse. . 
Cincinnati 

Troy f . m , 

Troy , 

Boston 

Cleveland. 
Cleveland., 

Boston 

Troy 

Buffalo 

Cleveland.. 

on 

Providence 
Cincinnati, 

Chicago 

Chicago.... 
Providence 
Cincinnati. 

Boston 

Boston 

Chicago 

Providence 
Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 
Boston 

>n. 

Providence 
Chicago.... 
Chicago...'. 
Providence 
Providence 

Chicago — 

Boston 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 
Boston 

Providence 
Cleveland.. 

Q 

Cleveland,. 
Boston 



Cleveland.. 

Boston 

onati, 
Cincinnati. 
Buffalo..... 
Providence 

Boston 

Boston 

Buffalo 

Providence 
Cincinnati. 
Providence 
Troy City.. 
Syracuse. . . 
Chicago.... 
Cleveland., 

Boston 

Providence 

Buffalo 

Cleveland.. 

Boston 

Providence 
Cincinnati. 

lo 

Chicago 

Providence 
Cincinnati. 

Boston 

Boston 

Chicago.... 
Svracu 
Cleveland*. 
Cincinnati, 

on 

on 

Providence 

Chicago 

Cleveland.. 
Providence 
Providence 
Chicago... , 
Boston 

Cincinnati. 

in 

to.... 

Piovhlence 
Cleveland.. 

on 

Cincinnati. 
Boston 



6 
6 
11 
5 
2 
8 
7 
8 
2 
2 

5 
11 
6 
4 
5 
2 
13 
16 
1Q 
li 
8 

IS 

8 

9 

8 

18 

9 

15 

10 

10 

8 

7 

lfi 

12 

11 

19 

6 



»w m? Mwm ^ w ^"^^^^ 



spalding's official 



115 



Recobd of Championship Games — Oontirwed. 



m 










Runs 


8 . 


Datk, 

1879. 


Names of Contestants. 


Whkbib 

PLAYED. 


Winning 
Club. 


SCOKKI* 


d 


3d 


•9-° 

U4 fS 






• 








35 


248 


Aug. 


89 


Providence vs. Syracuse. 


Providence 


Syracuse... 


7 


4 


249 




80 


Providence vs. Syracuse. 


Providence 


Providence 


6 


2 


250 


i» 


ao 


Boston vs. Troy City 


Boston..... 


Troy City.. 


4 


1 


251 


M 


80 


Cleveland vs. Cincinnati 


Cleveland.. 


Cleveland.. 


10 


3 


252 


Sept. 


i 


Cleveland vs. Cincinnati 


Cleveland.. 


Cincinnati. 


4 


8 


253 


" 


i 


Bnftalo vs. Chicago 

Chicago vs. Providence.. 


Buffalo, .. 


Chicago.... 
Providence 


4 


1 


254 




8 


Providence 


8 


1 


258 


M 


8 


Cleveland vs. Troy City. 


Troy 


Troy City.. 


5 


4 


250 




8 


Dos ton vs. Buffalo 


Boston 


Buffalo 


8 


5 


257 


(C 


4 


Syracuse vs. Cincinnati., 


Syracuse... 


Cincinnati. 


6 


2 


258 




4 


Chicago vs. Providence . 
Cleveland vs. Troy City. 


Providence 


Providence 


10 


3 




14 


4 


Troy ... 


Cleveland.. 


4 


1 


260 


" 


5 


Cleveland vs. Troy City.. 


Troy 


Cleveland.. 


6 


1 


261 


** 


B 


Buffalo vs. Boston 


Boston 


Bosion 


9 


3 


203 




B 


Svracuse vs. Cincinnati.. 


Syracuse, . . 


Cincinnati. 


18 


2 


s«a 




8 


Syracuse vs. Cincinnati. 


Syracuse. .. 


Cincinnati. 


6 





2M 


" 


6 


Providence vs. Chicago.. 


Providence 


Providence 


11 


5 


265 


U 


6 


Cleveland vs. Troy City. 


Troy 


Troy City.. 


13 


5 


206 




8 


Boston vs. Buffalo 


Boston 


Boston 


10 


1 


267 




s 


Cincinnati vs. Troy City. 


Troy 


Cincinnati. 


11 


5 


268 




R 


Providence vs. Buffalo. . . 


Providence 


Providence 


7 


4 


261) 




B 


Chicago vs. Boston 


Boston 


Boston 


10 





270 


" 


9 


Chicago vs. Boston 


Boston 


Boston 


4 





271 


II 


9 


Providence vs. Buffalo, . . 


Providence 


Buffalo 


4 


8 


279 




9 


Cleveland vs. Syracuse.. 


Syracuse. , . 


Cleveland.. 


5 





273 


M 


10 


Cleveland vs. Syracuse.. 


Syracuse,.. 


Syracuse... 


6 


ft 


874 




10 


ny vs. Cincinnati. 


Troy 


Trov City.. 


9 


4 


275 


« 


10 


Buffalo vs. Providence.., 


Providence 


Providence 


3 


2 


276 


" 


10 


Boston vs, Chicago 


Boston 


Boston 


17 


8 


277 


** 


11 


Cincinnati vs. Troy City. 


Troy 


Cincinnati. 


10 




278 




12 


(.'in irmati vs. Boston 


Boston 


Boston 


4 




279 


1 


12 


Buffalo vs. Troy City .... 
Cleveland vs. Providence 


Troy 


Buffalo 


8 




880 


" 


12 


Providence 


Providence 


8 




281 


ft 


1:; 


Cleveland vs. Providence 


Providence 


Cleveland.. 


2 






(1 


l:j 


Buffalo vs. Trov Citv.... 


Troy 


Buffalo 


10 




283 


M 


is 


Cincinnati vs. Boston 


Bosion 


Cincinnati. 


7 






" 


19 


Cincinnati vs. Boston 


Boston 


Cincinnati. 


5 






" 


15 


Buffalo vs. Troy Citv 


Troy 


Buffalo, 


4 




286 


** 


15 


Providence vs. Cleveland 


Providence 


Providence 


5 




287 


(| 


!•; 


Buffalo vs. Troy Citv 


Troy 


Buflalo 


2 




288 




17 


Chicago vs. Troy City 


Trov. 


Troy City.. 


5 




28!) 




17 


Providence vs. Cincinnati 


Providence 


Providence 


6 




290 


" 


17 


Boston vs. Cleveland 


Boston....; 


Boston 


4 




291 




3s 


Providence vs. Cincinnati 


Providence 


Providence 


5 




292 




19 


Providence vs. Cincinnati 


Providence 


Providence 


15 




298 




19 


Boston vs. Cleveland 


Boston 


Boston 

on 


10 




294 




90 


Boston vs. Cleveland 


Boston 


10 




295 


SO 


Chicago vs. Troy City. . . 
Buffalo vs. Cincinnati . . . 


Troy 

Buffalo 


Troy City.. 


6 




MM 


22 


Buffalo 


8 




IHfl 




88 


Buffalo vs. Cincinnati . . . 


Buffalo 


Buffalo 


12 




298 




88 


Chicago vs. Cleveland.. . 


Cleveland., 


Cleveland., 


10 





r 



11G 



BAAS BALL GUIDE. 



Recobd of Championship Games — Oontinusd. 



u 






o£ 


Date, 


^* 


1879. 


OPh 






o 






fc 






299 


Sept. 


23 


300 


24 


301 


it 


21 


302 


H 


25 


803 


II 


M 


304 


** 


89 


305 


|l 


26 


806 


(• 


20 


307 


|l 


26 


308 


l< 


87 


:m 


u 


27 


310 


M 


27 


311 


l« 


29 


312 


K 


21* 


818 


(( 


89 


314 


*« 


80 


315 


«< 


80 


316 


(4 


SO 



NAMES O* CONTESTANTS. 



Where 
Played. 



Winning 
Club. 



Runs 

S COKES. 



■So 



Providence vs. Boston... Boston.. 
Buffalo vs. Cincinnati... Bullalo. 
Chicago vh. Cleveland, 
Chicago vs. Cleveland. 
Boston vs. Providence.. 
Cincinnati vs. Buffalo.. . 
Cincinnati vs. Cleveland 

Buffalo vs. Chicago , 

Providence to. Boston... 
Providence vs. Boston.. , 

Buffalo to. Chicago 

Cincinn a i v s . Clevel a d d . 
Cincinnati vs. Cleveland, 

Buffalo vs. Chicago 

Providence to. Boston... 
Providence vs. Boston. . . 
Cleveland vs. Cincinnati 



Cleveland.. 
Cleveland.. 

Boston 

Buffalo 

Cleveland.. 

Buffalo 

Providence 

m 

Buffalo,. .. 
Cleveland,. 
Cleveland.. 
Bullalo. ... 

Providence 

Providence 
Cleveland.. 



Buffalo vs. Chicago (Buffalo.. 



Boston.. 
Cincinnati. 
Chicago,. . 

Chicago 

Providence 
Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 
Chicago — 
Providence 

Boston 

Buffalo 

Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 

Buffalo 

Providence 
Providence 
Cleveland.. 
Buffalo 



Total 243D 945 



Total Number of Runs Scored, 3,375. 



RUNS SCORED BY CLUBS. 

Providence 612 Opponents, 355 

Boston 561 " 348 

Chicago. 426 " 399 

Buffalo 384 " 360 

Cincinnati 483 " 402 

Cleveland.... 882 " 461 

TrojrCity 814 " 635 

Syracuse 274 " 455 

3.375 8.875 

Average number of runs scored per game by winning clubs. 7-69 

Average number of runs scored per game by losing clubs 2.99 



irm. q i ■ «ffiUf« v - pqQWP ^ 



bpalding's official 
OFFICERS AND PLAYERS. 



ill 



The following is an official list of the Officers and Players 
of Clubs belonging to the "National League of Professional 
Base Ball Clubs," for the season of 1880, as far as completed, 
March 1. 
BOSTON BASE BALL ASSOCIATION, OP BOSTON, 

MASS. 
A. H. Soden, President* Harry Wright, Secretary. 

E. B. Sutton, S. P. ilouck, 
John F. Morrill, Chas. J. Foley, 
J. J. Burdock, Thomas Bond, 
C W. Jones, John Ollourke, 
L. J. Brown, Philip Powers, 

Jasj, O'Rourke. 
BUFFALO BASE BALL ASSOCIATION, OF BUFFALO, 

N. Y. 
John B. Sage, President, H. S. Sprague, Secretary. 

Wm. McGuniglc, Thos. Pooraan, 

H. Richardson, W. M. Crowley, 

Oscar Walker, Charles Radbourn, 

Joseph Hornung, John C. Rowe, 

D. W. Force, Samuel N. Crane, 
CHICAGO BALL CLUB, OF CHICAGO, ILL. 

W. A. UvhBKRT? President. A. G. SrALDiNG, Secretary. 

108 Michigan woe. 
A. C. Anson, J. L. Quest, 

F. S. Flint, A. Dalrymple, 

E. N. Williamson, Geo. F. Gore, 

M. J. Kelly, Lawrence Corcoran, 

F. E. Goldsmith, Thomas Burns. 

Thos. L. Beals. 

CINCINNATI BASE BALL ASSOCIATION, OF CIN- 

CINNATI, O. 
Justus Thorner, President. C. T. Blackbttrn, Secretary 
J. E. Manning, A. J. Leonard, 

W. II. White, Samuel , Wright, 

J. E. Clapp, M. R. Mansell, 

Wm. PuicelL W. W. Carpenter, 

C. M. Smith. 

CLEVELAND BASE BALL ASSOCIATION, OF CLEVE- 
LAND, O. 

J. F. Evans, President. E. A. Harvey, Secretary. 

F. Dunlap, B. Gilligan, 

Edward Hanlan, W. B. Phillips, 






■118 



BaSK bai*l guide. 



M. J. Kennedy, 

Gao. Shaffer. 
P. J. Hotaling, 



J. W. Glasscock, 
F. Hankinson, 
_ Albert Hall, 

James McCormick. 
PROVIDENCE BASE BALL ASSOCIATION, OF PRO VL 

t m w e i* M.C.Dorgan, 

J. M. Ward, ww ^ n E.M. Grots" 

W. H. McGeary. 
TROY CITY BASE BALL ASSOCIATION, OF TROY 



Gardner Earl, Presided* 
J. P. Cassidy, 
P. Gillespie, 
L. P. Dickerson, 
Jacob Evans, 
R. Conner, 



C; R. DeFreest, Secretary 

E. J. Caskins, 
W. H. Holbert, 

F. Larkin, 
W. A. Harbidee, 
K Welch, 



Edward Coggswell. 

*r™ n n ^ ORC 58TERBAbBBALLCLTJR 
aoH. C. B. Pratt, iVwAta* Freeman Brown, Treasurer 
K'h' B ^ CR0FT ' Swetwy and Manager. 



J. L. Richmond, 
A. J. Bushong, 
J. F. Sullivan, 
Gibo. Creamer, 
Alonzo Knight, 



Chas. W. Bennett. 



A. W.. Whitney, 
A. A. Irwin, 
Geo. A. Wood, 
H. D. Stovey, 
F. C. Nichols,